Late cretaceous stratigraphy in the mudurnu–göynük basin (Turkey) and inferences on sea-level change in the late campanian to early maastrichtian

Erik Wolfgring, Michael Wagreich*, Ismail O. Yilmaz, Liu Shasha, Katharina Boehm

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book / Report / Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Upper Cretaceous strata at Göynük, northwestern Anatolia, Turkey, provide a geological record of the Campanian–Maastrichtian from the Sakarya Terrane along the active Neotethys margin. Shales and shaly marls with siliciclastic and volcaniclastic intercalations indicate a pelagic palaeoenvironment rich in planktonic and benthonic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossil assemblages. A composite record from the Campanian to the Maastrichtian records nannofossil standard zones UC15c (CC21) to UC20a (CC26) as well as the Globotrunanella havanensis planktonic foraminifera Zone to the Racemiguembelina fructicosa planktonic foraminifera Zone. The complete ‘mid’-Campanian to early Maastrichtian composite section can be correlated to other western Tethyan sections. The Campanian–Maastrichtian boundary is positioned between the first occurrence of the planktonic foraminifera Gansserina gansseri and the last occurrence of the nannofossil Uniplanarius trifidus. Clastic input and higher sedimentation rates constrain regional sea-level lowstands around the late Campanian calcarata Zone and the Campanian–Maastrichtian boundary, corresponding to the Campanian–Maastrichtian boundary event.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCretaceous Climate Events and Short-Term Sea-Level Changes
EditorsM. Wagreich, M. Hart, B. Sames, I.O. Yilmaz
PublisherGeological Society of London
Pages129-146
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9781786204790
ISBN (Print)9781786204745
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Apr 2020

Publication series

NameGeological Society Special Publications
Volume498
ISSN (Print)0305-8719

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