Late-life depressive symptoms, religiousness, and mood in the last week of life

A.W. Braam, M. Klinkenberg, H. Galenkamp, D.J.H. Deeg

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    Abstract

    Aim of the current study is to examine whether previous depressive symptoms modify possible effects of religiousness on mood in the last week of life. After-death interviews with proxy respondents of deceased sample members of the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam provided information on depressed mood in the last week of life, as well as on the presence of a sense of peace with the approaching end of life. Other characteristics were derived from interviews with the sample members when still alive. Significant interactions were identified between measures of religiousness and previous depressive symptoms (CES-D scores) in their associations with mood in the last week of life. Among those with previous depressive symptoms, church-membership, church-attendance and salience of religion were associated with a greater likelihood of depressed mood in the last week of life. Among those without previous depressive symptoms, church-attendance and salience of religion were associated with a higher likelihood of a sense of peace. For older adults in the last phase of life, supportive effects of religiousness were more or less expected. Fore those with recent depressive symptoms, however, religiousness might involve a component of existential doubt. © 2012 Arjan W. Braam et al.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article number754031
    Number of pages10
    JournalDepression research and treatment
    Volume2012
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

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