Lexical ambiguity resolution in good and poor comprehenders: An eye fixation and self-paced reading study in primary school children

M. van der Schoot, A.L. Vasbinder, T.M. Horsley, A.H.A. Reijntjes, E.C.D.M. van Lieshout

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

To investigate the use of context and monitoring of comprehension in lexical ambiguity resolution in children, the authors asked 10- to 12-year-old good and poor comprehenders to read sentences consisting of 2 clauses, 1 containing the ambiguous word and the other the disambiguating information. The order of the clauses was reversed so that disambiguating information either preceded or followed the ambiguous word. Context use and comprehension monitoring were examined by measuring eye fixations (Experiment 1) and self-paced reading times (Experiment 2) on the ambiguous word and disambiguating region. The results of Experiment 1 and 2 showed that poor comprehenders made use of prior context to facilitate lexical ambiguity resolution as effectively as good comprehenders but that they monitored their comprehension less effectively than good comprehenders. Good comprehenders corrected an initial interpretation error on an ambiguous word and restored comprehension once they encountered the disambiguating region. Poor comprehenders failed to deal with this type of comprehension failure. © 2009 American Psychological Association.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)21-36
Number of pages16
JournalThe Journal of Educational Psychology
Volume101
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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