Life at cold seeps: a synthesis of biogeochemical and ecological data from Kazan mud volcano, eastern Mediterranean Sea

J.P. Werne, R.R. Haese, T.A.C. Zitter, G Aloisi, I. Bouloubassi, S. Heijs, A. Fiala-Medioni, R.D. Pancost, J.S. Sinninghe Damste, G. de Lange, L.J. Forney, J.C. Gottschal, J.-P. Foucher, J. Mascle, J.M. Woodside, Party MEDINAUT and MEDINETH

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    Recent field observations have identified the widespread occurrence of fluid seepage through the eastern Mediterranean Sea floor in association with mud volcanism or along deep faults. Gas hydrates and methane seeps are frequently found in cold seep areas and were anticipated targets of the MEDINAUT/MEDINETH initiatives. The study presented herein has utilized a multi-disciplinary approach incorporating observations and sampling of visually selected sites by the manned submersible Nautile and by ship-based sediment coring and geophysical surveys. The study focuses on the biogeochemical and ecological processes and conditions related to methane seepage, especially the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), associated with ascending fluids on Kazan mud volcano in the eastern Mediterranean. Sampling of adjacent box cores for studies on the microbiology, biomarkers, pore water and solid phase geochemistry allowed us to integrate different biogeochemical data within a spatially highly heterogeneous system. Geophysical results clearly indicate the spatial heterogeneity of mud volcano environments. Results from pore water geochemistry and modeling efforts indicate that the rate of AOM is ∼6 mol m
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)367-399
    JournalChemical Geology
    Volume205
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2004

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