Living apart (or) together—neighbours’ views and experiences on their relationships with neighbours with and without intellectual disabilities

Tessa Overmars-Marx*, Barbara Pepping, Fleur Thomése

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Background: Neighbours play an important role in the social inclusion of people with intellectual disabilities. Neighbouring in general might help understand the social interactions between neighbours with and without intellectual disabilities. Our study focuses on gaining insight into neighbouring patterns and how people with intellectual disabilities fit in them. Method: 26 interviews were conducted with 29 neighbours of people with intellectual disabilities on their norms and behaviours towards neighbours with and without disabilities. Results: Four patterns were identified: feeling an outsider, fleeting contacts, individualized neighbourliness and sense of community. Discussion: Participants perceived neighbours with intellectual disabilities as different: they are difficult to approach and show inappropriate behaviour. The groups shared most general perceptions, but there were differences. The first two groups mostly had fleeting encounters, whereas the last groups seemed more open to communal activities and assisting neighbours. In enhancing social inclusion, staff should be aware of these neighbouring patterns.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1008-1020
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities
Volume31
Issue number6
Early online date23 Apr 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2018

Keywords

  • neighbouring
  • people with intellectual disabilities
  • qualitative research
  • social inclusion

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