Longitudinal Associations Between Adolescents' Bullying-Related Indirect Defending, Outsider Behavior, and Peer-Group Status

Jeroen Pronk*, Tjeert Olthof, Elisabeth A. Aleva, Matty van der Meulen, Marjolijn M. Vermande, Frits A. Goossens

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

During adolescence, youth become more likely to avoid involvement in witnessed bullying and less likely to support victims. It is unknown whether—and how—these bystander behaviors (i.e., outsider behavior and indirect defending) are associated with adolescents' peer-group status (i.e., popularity and social acceptance) over time. Cross-lagged path modeling was used to examine these longitudinal associations in a sample of 313 Dutch adolescents (Mage-T1 = 10.3 years). The results showed that status longitudinally predicted behavior, rather than that behavior predicted status. Specifically, unpopularity predicted outsider behavior and social acceptance predicted indirect defending. These findings suggest that a positive peer-group status can trigger adolescents' provictim stance. However, adolescents may also strategically avoid involvement in witnessed bullying to keep a low social profile.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-99
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
Volume30
Issue numberS1
Early online date29 Aug 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2020

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