'Mapping' the Broader Social and Geographic Space and its interplay with individual careers and work identities

Julia Muhlhaus

Research output: PhD ThesisPhD Thesis - Research VU Amsterdam, graduation VU Amsterdam

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Abstract

Careers and work identities do not solely evolve in single organizations. Instead, they take shape in a variety of broader social and geographic contexts. Yet, insights into the nature of such contexts and how these are linked with individual careers and work identities remain scarce. To address this limitation, this dissertation adopts a spatial perspective, conceptualizing context in terms of social and geographic space. The aim is to carefully map the broader social and geographic space so as to better understand its interplay with individual careers and work identities. The findings of this dissertation underscore the need for broadening understanding of context beyond organizations. The three empirical studies demonstrate that occupation, unemployment and the city constitute important alternative frames through which individuals make sense of their careers and work identities. By mapping what is inside and outside of these types of space, locating other social actors and capturing these spaces’ institutional logics, this dissertation contributes to a more detailed understanding of how individuals negotiate their careers and work identities in light of the unique characteristics of different types of broader social and geographic space. The findings also provide first insights into how this space is, in turn, shaped by the enactment of careers and work identities.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationPhD
Awarding Institution
  • Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Khapova, S.N., Supervisor
  • Bouwmeester, O, Co-supervisor
Award date2 Feb 2021
Publication statusPublished - 2 Feb 2021

Keywords

  • Careers
  • Space
  • Work identity

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