Me, my selfie, and I: the relations between selfie behaviors, body image, self-objectification, and self-esteem in young women

J. Veldhuis, Jessica M. Alleva, A.J.D. Bij de Vaate, M.G. Keijer, E.A. Konijn

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Due to the enormous popularity of social networking sites (SNSs), online and offline social lives seem inextricably linked, which raises concerns for how SNS use relates to psychological health. Similarly, the omnipresence of selfies on SNSs—a form of appearance-related exposure—raises concerns regarding psychological health. This study aimed to investigate the relationships between body image, self-objectification, self-esteem, and various selfie behaviors among young women (N = 179). We hypothesized that a worsened body image (i.e., higher body dissatisfaction or lower body appreciation), higher levels of self-objectification, and lower self-esteem would precede greater engagement in selfie behaviors. Structural equation modeling showed that body appreciation is associated with greater engagement in selfie selection and deliberate posting, and that self-objectification is related to greater engagement in all selfie behaviors assessed. In support of our proposed model, a reversed model was also tested that showed poorer results. These findings suggest that body image may serve not only as an outcome of SNS use but also as a motive preceding selfie behaviors.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-17
JournalPsychology of Popular Media Culture
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 20 Aug 2018

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objectification
body image
Body Image
Social Networking
Self Concept
self-esteem
Health
networking
Psychology
health
popularity

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title = "Me, my selfie, and I: the relations between selfie behaviors, body image, self-objectification, and self-esteem in young women",
abstract = "Due to the enormous popularity of social networking sites (SNSs), online and offline social lives seem inextricably linked, which raises concerns for how SNS use relates to psychological health. Similarly, the omnipresence of selfies on SNSs—a form of appearance-related exposure—raises concerns regarding psychological health. This study aimed to investigate the relationships between body image, self-objectification, self-esteem, and various selfie behaviors among young women (N = 179). We hypothesized that a worsened body image (i.e., higher body dissatisfaction or lower body appreciation), higher levels of self-objectification, and lower self-esteem would precede greater engagement in selfie behaviors. Structural equation modeling showed that body appreciation is associated with greater engagement in selfie selection and deliberate posting, and that self-objectification is related to greater engagement in all selfie behaviors assessed. In support of our proposed model, a reversed model was also tested that showed poorer results. These findings suggest that body image may serve not only as an outcome of SNS use but also as a motive preceding selfie behaviors.",
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Me, my selfie, and I: the relations between selfie behaviors, body image, self-objectification, and self-esteem in young women. / Veldhuis, J.; Alleva, Jessica M.; Bij de Vaate, A.J.D.; Keijer, M.G.; Konijn, E.A.

In: Psychology of Popular Media Culture, 20.08.2018, p. 1-17.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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