Mending the levee: How supernaturally anchored conceptions of the person impact on trauma perception and healing among children (cases from Madagascar and Nepal)

S.J.T.M. Evers, M. van der Brug, F. van Wesel, L. Krabbendam

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

When dealing with children and youth who experience distressing events, psychosocial diagnostics and healing programmes principally resort to biomedical models. Children are often viewed as individualised ‘victims’ suffering from trauma and ‘in need’ of outside help. Highlighting case studies from Madagascar and Nepal, this article argues that the biomedical approach to trauma would be strengthened by a concomitant analysis of social networks, including the perceived relations with the supernatural. The various tandems of family and kin relationships, the living and the dead, constitute not only a social ‘levee’ breached by distressing events, but also the locus around which social relations are rebuilt.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)423-433
Number of pages11
JournalChildren & Society
Volume2016
Issue number30
Early online date27 Mar 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Madagascar
Nepal
trauma
human being
event
Wounds and Injuries
Social Support
Social Relations
social network
diagnostic
experience

Bibliographical note

Mending the Levee: How Supernaturally Anchored Conceptions of the Person Impact on Trauma Perception and Healing among Children (Cases from Madagascar and Nepal)

Cite this

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Mending the levee: How supernaturally anchored conceptions of the person impact on trauma perception and healing among children (cases from Madagascar and Nepal). / Evers, S.J.T.M.; van der Brug, M.; van Wesel, F.; Krabbendam, L.

In: Children & Society, Vol. 2016, No. 30, 2016, p. 423-433.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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