Mineralogical diversity and geology of Humboldt crater derived using Moon Mineralogy Mapper data

M. Martinot, S. Besse, J. Flahaut, C. Quantin-Nataf, L. Lozac'h, W. van Westrenen

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) spectroscopic data and high-resolution imagery data sets were used to study the mineralogy and geology of the 207 km diameter Humboldt crater. Analyses of M3 data, using a custom-made method for M3 spectra continuum removal and spectral parameters calculation, reveal multiple pure crystalline plagioclase detections within the Humboldt crater central peak complex, hinting at its crustal origin. However, olivine, spinel, and glass are observed in the crater walls and rims, suggesting these minerals derive from shallower levels than the plagioclase of the central peak complex. High-calcium pyroxenes are detected in association with volcanic deposits emplaced on the crater's floor. Geologic mapping was performed, and the age of Humboldt crater's units was estimated from crater counts. Results suggest that volcanic activity within this floor-fractured crater spanned over a billion years. The felsic mineralogy of the central peak complex region, which presumably excavated deeper material, and the shallow mafic minerals (olivine and spinel) detected in Humboldt crater walls and rim are not in accordance with the general view of the structure of the lunar crust. Our observations can be explained by the presence of a mafic pluton emplaced in the anorthositic crust prior to the Humboldt-forming impact event. Alternatively, the excavation of Australe basin ejecta could explain the observed mineralogical detections. This highlights the importance of detailed combined mineralogical and geological remote sensing studies to assess the heterogeneity of the lunar crust.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)612-629
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research
Volume123
Issue number2
Early online date21 Dec 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Feb 2018

Fingerprint

Mineralogy
Moon
mineralogy
geology
Geology
moon
craters
plagioclase
crater
Olivine
Minerals
minerals
volcanic activity
lunar crust
Excavation
remote sensing
glass
Remote sensing
Calcium
Deposits

Keywords

  • central peak complex
  • geological map
  • Humboldt crater
  • mineralogy
  • Moon Mineralogy Mapper

Cite this

Martinot, M. ; Besse, S. ; Flahaut, J. ; Quantin-Nataf, C. ; Lozac'h, L. ; van Westrenen, W. / Mineralogical diversity and geology of Humboldt crater derived using Moon Mineralogy Mapper data. In: Journal of Geophysical Research. 2018 ; Vol. 123, No. 2. pp. 612-629.
@article{a9246fa585a94006be5af1ff893c694a,
title = "Mineralogical diversity and geology of Humboldt crater derived using Moon Mineralogy Mapper data",
abstract = "Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) spectroscopic data and high-resolution imagery data sets were used to study the mineralogy and geology of the 207 km diameter Humboldt crater. Analyses of M3 data, using a custom-made method for M3 spectra continuum removal and spectral parameters calculation, reveal multiple pure crystalline plagioclase detections within the Humboldt crater central peak complex, hinting at its crustal origin. However, olivine, spinel, and glass are observed in the crater walls and rims, suggesting these minerals derive from shallower levels than the plagioclase of the central peak complex. High-calcium pyroxenes are detected in association with volcanic deposits emplaced on the crater's floor. Geologic mapping was performed, and the age of Humboldt crater's units was estimated from crater counts. Results suggest that volcanic activity within this floor-fractured crater spanned over a billion years. The felsic mineralogy of the central peak complex region, which presumably excavated deeper material, and the shallow mafic minerals (olivine and spinel) detected in Humboldt crater walls and rim are not in accordance with the general view of the structure of the lunar crust. Our observations can be explained by the presence of a mafic pluton emplaced in the anorthositic crust prior to the Humboldt-forming impact event. Alternatively, the excavation of Australe basin ejecta could explain the observed mineralogical detections. This highlights the importance of detailed combined mineralogical and geological remote sensing studies to assess the heterogeneity of the lunar crust.",
keywords = "central peak complex, geological map, Humboldt crater, mineralogy, Moon Mineralogy Mapper",
author = "M. Martinot and S. Besse and J. Flahaut and C. Quantin-Nataf and L. Lozac'h and W. van Westrenen",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
day = "26",
doi = "10.1002/2017JE005435",
language = "English",
volume = "123",
pages = "612--629",
journal = "Journal of Geophysical Research",
issn = "0148-0227",
publisher = "American Geophysical Union",
number = "2",

}

Mineralogical diversity and geology of Humboldt crater derived using Moon Mineralogy Mapper data. / Martinot, M.; Besse, S.; Flahaut, J.; Quantin-Nataf, C.; Lozac'h, L.; van Westrenen, W.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 123, No. 2, 26.02.2018, p. 612-629.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mineralogical diversity and geology of Humboldt crater derived using Moon Mineralogy Mapper data

AU - Martinot, M.

AU - Besse, S.

AU - Flahaut, J.

AU - Quantin-Nataf, C.

AU - Lozac'h, L.

AU - van Westrenen, W.

PY - 2018/2/26

Y1 - 2018/2/26

N2 - Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) spectroscopic data and high-resolution imagery data sets were used to study the mineralogy and geology of the 207 km diameter Humboldt crater. Analyses of M3 data, using a custom-made method for M3 spectra continuum removal and spectral parameters calculation, reveal multiple pure crystalline plagioclase detections within the Humboldt crater central peak complex, hinting at its crustal origin. However, olivine, spinel, and glass are observed in the crater walls and rims, suggesting these minerals derive from shallower levels than the plagioclase of the central peak complex. High-calcium pyroxenes are detected in association with volcanic deposits emplaced on the crater's floor. Geologic mapping was performed, and the age of Humboldt crater's units was estimated from crater counts. Results suggest that volcanic activity within this floor-fractured crater spanned over a billion years. The felsic mineralogy of the central peak complex region, which presumably excavated deeper material, and the shallow mafic minerals (olivine and spinel) detected in Humboldt crater walls and rim are not in accordance with the general view of the structure of the lunar crust. Our observations can be explained by the presence of a mafic pluton emplaced in the anorthositic crust prior to the Humboldt-forming impact event. Alternatively, the excavation of Australe basin ejecta could explain the observed mineralogical detections. This highlights the importance of detailed combined mineralogical and geological remote sensing studies to assess the heterogeneity of the lunar crust.

AB - Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) spectroscopic data and high-resolution imagery data sets were used to study the mineralogy and geology of the 207 km diameter Humboldt crater. Analyses of M3 data, using a custom-made method for M3 spectra continuum removal and spectral parameters calculation, reveal multiple pure crystalline plagioclase detections within the Humboldt crater central peak complex, hinting at its crustal origin. However, olivine, spinel, and glass are observed in the crater walls and rims, suggesting these minerals derive from shallower levels than the plagioclase of the central peak complex. High-calcium pyroxenes are detected in association with volcanic deposits emplaced on the crater's floor. Geologic mapping was performed, and the age of Humboldt crater's units was estimated from crater counts. Results suggest that volcanic activity within this floor-fractured crater spanned over a billion years. The felsic mineralogy of the central peak complex region, which presumably excavated deeper material, and the shallow mafic minerals (olivine and spinel) detected in Humboldt crater walls and rim are not in accordance with the general view of the structure of the lunar crust. Our observations can be explained by the presence of a mafic pluton emplaced in the anorthositic crust prior to the Humboldt-forming impact event. Alternatively, the excavation of Australe basin ejecta could explain the observed mineralogical detections. This highlights the importance of detailed combined mineralogical and geological remote sensing studies to assess the heterogeneity of the lunar crust.

KW - central peak complex

KW - geological map

KW - Humboldt crater

KW - mineralogy

KW - Moon Mineralogy Mapper

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85042524888&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85042524888&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/2017JE005435

DO - 10.1002/2017JE005435

M3 - Article

VL - 123

SP - 612

EP - 629

JO - Journal of Geophysical Research

JF - Journal of Geophysical Research

SN - 0148-0227

IS - 2

ER -