Multiple Religious Belonging among visitors of Dominican spiritual centers in the Netherlands

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

In the religiously pluralized Western world, a trend called ‘Multiple Religious Belonging’ (MRB) has been identified. Although it is a much theologically debated concept, empirical research on the practice of MRB is limited. The present research project therefore explores the phenomenon of MRB among visitors of Dominican spiritual centers in the Netherlands (n=472). It investigates to what extent and in which ways such visitors combine elements from more than one religious tradition in their lives and what they perceive to be the benefits of combining elements. It links this information to their views on religion, the resources they draw from, their (religiously diverse) networks, and their motivations for attending spiritual activities. The results indicate that respondents who combine elements from more than one religious tradition (‘combiners’) are more likely than ‘non-combiners’ to: a) see religion as something that is constantly changing during the life course; b) have networks which are religiously diverse; c) place importance on nature, in-depth conversations, personal rituals or practices, and theological, philosophical, and spiritual texts as resources; d) be motivated to attend spiritual centers because of a
focus on self-exploration.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)407-426
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Contemporary Religion
Volume33
Issue number3
Early online date5 Dec 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Fingerprint

Netherlands
Religion
Western world
resources
empirical research
religious behavior
conversation
research project
trend
Dominicans
The Netherlands
Resources
Religious Traditions

Cite this

@article{8b04b9d9aecc4d38b58ed0f91ce5a361,
title = "Multiple Religious Belonging among visitors of Dominican spiritual centers in the Netherlands",
abstract = "In the religiously pluralized Western world, a trend called ‘Multiple Religious Belonging’ (MRB) has been identified. Although it is a much theologically debated concept, empirical research on the practice of MRB is limited. The present research project therefore explores the phenomenon of MRB among visitors of Dominican spiritual centers in the Netherlands (n=472). It investigates to what extent and in which ways such visitors combine elements from more than one religious tradition in their lives and what they perceive to be the benefits of combining elements. It links this information to their views on religion, the resources they draw from, their (religiously diverse) networks, and their motivations for attending spiritual activities. The results indicate that respondents who combine elements from more than one religious tradition (‘combiners’) are more likely than ‘non-combiners’ to: a) see religion as something that is constantly changing during the life course; b) have networks which are religiously diverse; c) place importance on nature, in-depth conversations, personal rituals or practices, and theological, philosophical, and spiritual texts as resources; d) be motivated to attend spiritual centers because of afocus on self-exploration.",
author = "A.I. Liefbroer and {van der Braak}, A.F.M. and M. Kalsky",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1080/13537903.2018.1535362",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "407--426",
journal = "Journal of Contemporary Religion",
issn = "1353-7903",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "3",

}

Multiple Religious Belonging among visitors of Dominican spiritual centers in the Netherlands. / Liefbroer, A.I. ; van der Braak, A.F.M.; Kalsky, M.

In: Journal of Contemporary Religion, Vol. 33, No. 3, 2018, p. 407-426.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Multiple Religious Belonging among visitors of Dominican spiritual centers in the Netherlands

AU - Liefbroer, A.I.

AU - van der Braak, A.F.M.

AU - Kalsky, M.

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - In the religiously pluralized Western world, a trend called ‘Multiple Religious Belonging’ (MRB) has been identified. Although it is a much theologically debated concept, empirical research on the practice of MRB is limited. The present research project therefore explores the phenomenon of MRB among visitors of Dominican spiritual centers in the Netherlands (n=472). It investigates to what extent and in which ways such visitors combine elements from more than one religious tradition in their lives and what they perceive to be the benefits of combining elements. It links this information to their views on religion, the resources they draw from, their (religiously diverse) networks, and their motivations for attending spiritual activities. The results indicate that respondents who combine elements from more than one religious tradition (‘combiners’) are more likely than ‘non-combiners’ to: a) see religion as something that is constantly changing during the life course; b) have networks which are religiously diverse; c) place importance on nature, in-depth conversations, personal rituals or practices, and theological, philosophical, and spiritual texts as resources; d) be motivated to attend spiritual centers because of afocus on self-exploration.

AB - In the religiously pluralized Western world, a trend called ‘Multiple Religious Belonging’ (MRB) has been identified. Although it is a much theologically debated concept, empirical research on the practice of MRB is limited. The present research project therefore explores the phenomenon of MRB among visitors of Dominican spiritual centers in the Netherlands (n=472). It investigates to what extent and in which ways such visitors combine elements from more than one religious tradition in their lives and what they perceive to be the benefits of combining elements. It links this information to their views on religion, the resources they draw from, their (religiously diverse) networks, and their motivations for attending spiritual activities. The results indicate that respondents who combine elements from more than one religious tradition (‘combiners’) are more likely than ‘non-combiners’ to: a) see religion as something that is constantly changing during the life course; b) have networks which are religiously diverse; c) place importance on nature, in-depth conversations, personal rituals or practices, and theological, philosophical, and spiritual texts as resources; d) be motivated to attend spiritual centers because of afocus on self-exploration.

U2 - 10.1080/13537903.2018.1535362

DO - 10.1080/13537903.2018.1535362

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 407

EP - 426

JO - Journal of Contemporary Religion

JF - Journal of Contemporary Religion

SN - 1353-7903

IS - 3

ER -