Mutual Trust and Cross-Border Enforcement of Judgments in Civil Matters in the EU: Does the Step-by-Step Approach Work?

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Abstract

Mutual trust is one of the cornerstones of cooperation in the field of European Union private international law. Based on this principle the rules on the cross-border recognition and enforcement of judgments in the European Union are still subject to simplification. The step-by-step approach of the implementation of this principle led to the abolition of the exequatur, often accompanied by a partial harmonization of enforcement law to improve and support the smooth working of cross-border enforcement without exequatur. In this regard, it seems that the Member States still want to have control over the ‘import’ of judgments which results in maintaining the ground for non-recognition and the possibility of relying on them in the Member State of enforcement. This article considers the implementation of the principle of mutual recognition in three areas of justice: civil and commercial matters, family law and maintenance. In these areas the European Union legislator has chosen three different approaches for the implementation of this principle.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-139
Number of pages25
JournalNetherlands International Law Review
Volume2017
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Mar 2017

Keywords

  • Regulation 1215/2012
  • Regulation 4/2009
  • Regulation 44/2001
  • enforcement
  • exequatur
  • mutual trust – mutual recognition – area of freedom, security and justice – human rights – effective judicial protection

VU Research Profile

  • Governance for Society

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