Non-Destructive Survey of Early Roman Copper-Alloy Brooches using Portable X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry

M. A. Roxburgh, S. Heeren, D. J. Huisman, B. J.H. Van Os

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This paper argues that portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (pXRF) is a suitable elemental measurement technique to study the production of copper-alloy artefacts. However, rather than try to imitate the accuracy and precision of laboratory techniques, it is more beneficial to deploy it in a survey role, one that attempts to model chronological and geographical changes within large quantities of artefacts. To achieve this, it was investigated to what extent corrosion and the issues surrounding surface measurements affect the potential of this type of research. Analyses on early Roman period brooches gathered in the Nijmegen region of the Netherlands were subsequently compared with published data.

LanguageEnglish
Pages55-69
Number of pages15
JournalArchaeometry
Volume61
Issue number1
Early online date2 Jul 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2019

Fingerprint

artifact
Netherlands
Brooches
Artifact
X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry
Copper Alloys
Portable X-ray Fluorescence
The Netherlands
Corrosion
Roman Period

Keywords

  • COPPER ALLOY
  • CORROSION
  • ROMAN BROOCHES
  • pXRF

Cite this

Roxburgh, M. A. ; Heeren, S. ; Huisman, D. J. ; Van Os, B. J.H. / Non-Destructive Survey of Early Roman Copper-Alloy Brooches using Portable X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry. In: Archaeometry. 2019 ; Vol. 61, No. 1. pp. 55-69.
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Non-Destructive Survey of Early Roman Copper-Alloy Brooches using Portable X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry. / Roxburgh, M. A.; Heeren, S.; Huisman, D. J.; Van Os, B. J.H.

In: Archaeometry, Vol. 61, No. 1, 02.2019, p. 55-69.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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