On frontline workers as bureau-political actors: The case of civil–military crisis management

J.P. Kalkman, Peter Groenewegen

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

We focus attention on the public policy-making influence of frontline bureaucrats. They are increasingly operating in interorganizational partnerships and networks in which they develop collaborative relations with frontline workers of other public organizations. We theorize that their embeddedness in local interorganizational environments induces and enables them to defy locally inappropriate policies and to pursue locally relevant policies as policy entrepreneurs simultaneously. The case study of policy-making in Dutch civil–military crisis management demonstrates that this “frontline bureaucratic politics” bears considerably on policy outcomes. We conclude that viewing frontline workers as bureau-political actors enhances our understanding of public policy-making in interorganizational arrangements.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAdministration and Society
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 8 Jun 2018

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political actor
public policy
worker
management
entrepreneur
politics
Crisis management
Workers
Public policy making

Cite this

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On frontline workers as bureau-political actors: The case of civil–military crisis management. / Kalkman, J.P.; Groenewegen, Peter.

In: Administration and Society, 08.06.2018.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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