On tensions and opportunities: Building partnerships between government and sex worker-led organizations in Kenya in the fight against HIV/AIDS

N. Stapele van, L.S. Nencel, I.H.J. Sabelis

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This research reveals how the experienced Btokenism^ by sex workers’ representatives who take part in HIV prevention and care partnerships hinges on a lack of expertise by Btechnical experts^ to make use of the different types of knowledge brought to the policy table by them. The article further explores other tensions and opportunities within HIV prevention and care partnerships in
Kenya, including the effect of criminalization and devolution on the partnerships. Recent strategic frameworks developed by the government explicitly mention the need for horizontal partnerships between sex workers and government as a crucial step to achieve a more unified and effective response to HIV/AIDS. In addition, during several conversations, government representatives
also maintained that more horizontal partnerships can only be achieved through community participation. They defined this as taking sex workers as equal partners in policy development and program implementations. In practice, however, such partnerships have yet to become fully established. All this leads to the main question: where and why do gaps exist between policy visions and actual practices in HIV prevention and care partnerships between government and sex worker-led organizations in Kenya?
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalSexuality Research and Social Policy
Early online date30 May 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 30 May 2018

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workers' organization
Sex Workers
Kenya
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
AIDS
HIV
Organizations
Policy Making
worker
criminalization
development policy
decentralization
Research
expertise
conversation
expert
participation
lack

Keywords

  • Sex worker-led organizations . Horizontal partnerships . Nairobi Kenya . HIV/AIDS prevention and care . Policy development .
  • Tokenism

Cite this

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