On the mediating effects of pregnancy and birth stress events on the relation between lateral preferences and cognitive functioning in healthy school-aged children.

W. van der Elst, R. Wassenberg, C. Meijs, P. Hurks, M. P. J. van Boxtel, J. Jolles

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

If the pathological left-handedness theory is valid, left-handed people who also experienced pregnancy and birth stress events (PBSEs) would especially be expected to deviate from the cognitive norm (rather than left-handers in general). This hypothesis was tested in a large sample of healthy children (aged 6.6-15.9 years). Multiple cognitive abilities were assessed, including verbal fluency and working memory. Children with a left lateral preference who also experienced a PBSE did not deviate from the cognitive norm. Age was positively associated with all cognitive measures, and mean level of parental education strongly affected verbal fluency functioning. © 2011 Psychology Press.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)548-558
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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