Sobre la naturaleza narrativa de las representaciones icónicas de los Infantes: Algunas evidenciase implicaciones

Translated title of the contribution: On the narrative nature of young children's iconic representations: Some evidence and implications

Bert Van Oers*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Reflection on the relationship between a sign and its meaning (i.e. semiotic activity) is a fundamental form of cognitive activity that already occurs at an early age. The improvement of this semiotic activity in young children prepares for their later learning activity. Iconic representations are one important category of signs for young children (3‐7 years old). Iconic representations (drawings, diagrams, schemes) are generally conceived of as means bridging the gap between early enactive, perception‐bound thinking and abstract‐symbolical thinking. From the Vygotskian perspective iconic representations are complex signs referring to some object (situation, action) in a special way. On the bases on the analysis of children's drawings it is argued that iconic representations are narrative in nature for young children. Children tend to supplement their drawings with verbal symbols in order to make sure that their intended meanings are maximally clear. In doing so, children learn to carry out semiotic activity and improve this activity with the help of more abstract symbols.

Translated title of the contributionOn the narrative nature of young children's iconic representations: Some evidence and implications
Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)237-245
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Early Years Education
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1997

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