On the Uses of Foucault for International Law

T.E. Aalberts, B. Golder

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This symposium concerns the utility of the work of the French philosopher and social theorist, Michel Foucault (1926-84), for international law as an academic discipline. It almost goes without saying that there are several different ways to approach this question of utility. We want to introduce the symposium by sketching just a few of the different avenues by which one could approach the question of Foucault's utility for theorizing international law. One dominant understanding within the extant legal literature on Foucault is essentially to ask after his own legal-theoretical credentials. This approach is based on the seemingly straightforward and widely shared presupposition that if his 'work offers no plausible account of law, why should legal scholars take him seriously? If we seek to bring Foucault into law, must we not first seek to bring law into Foucault?'
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)603-608
JournalLeiden Journal of International law
Volume2012
Issue number25/3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Aalberts, T.E. ; Golder, B. / On the Uses of Foucault for International Law. In: Leiden Journal of International law. 2012 ; Vol. 2012, No. 25/3. pp. 603-608.
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On the Uses of Foucault for International Law. / Aalberts, T.E.; Golder, B.

In: Leiden Journal of International law, Vol. 2012, No. 25/3, 2012, p. 603-608.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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