Ostracism and prosocial behavior: A social dilemm analysis

D.P. Balliet, D. L. Ferris

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    Prior research has yielded mixed findings regarding the relation of ostracism to prosocial behavior, with studies indicating ostracism leads people to become less prosocial, more prosocial, or that prosocial behavior is unaffected by workplace ostracism. By conceptualizing prosocial behavior at work as a social dilemma, we hypothesized that whether or not individuals reduce prosocial behaviors following ostracism can be understood by how individuals manage the conflict between the immediate temptation to treat others poorly and the long-term benefits of not giving into such temptations. Across three studies - a scenario (Study 1), experimental (Study 2), and field study on employed adults (Study 3) - we find support for the hypothesis that individuals who are less (versus more) oriented towards future outcomes engage in less prosocial behaviors with others who have ostracized them during prior interactions. We discuss both the practical and theoretical implications of these findings. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)298-308
    JournalOrganizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes
    Volume120
    Issue number2
    Early online date2 Jul 2012
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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    Ostracism and prosocial behavior: A social dilemm analysis. / Balliet, D.P.; Ferris, D. L.

    In: Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Vol. 120, No. 2, 2013, p. 298-308.

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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