Parental desensitization to violence and sex in movies

D. Romer, P.E. Jamieson, B.J. Bushman, A. Bleakley, A. Wang, D. Langleben, K.H. Jamieson

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To assess desensitization in parents' repeated exposure to violence and sex in movies. METHODS: A national US sample of 1000 parents living with at least 1 target child in 1 of 3 age groups (6 to 17 years old) viewed a random sequence of 3 pairs of short scenes with either violent or sexual content from popular movies that were unrestricted to youth audiences (rated PG-13 or unrated) or restricted to those under age 17 years without adult supervision (rated R). Parents indicated the minimum age they would consider appropriate to view each film. Predictors included order of presentation, parent and child characteristics, and parent movie viewing history. RESULTS: As exposure to successive clips progressed, parents supported younger ages of appropriate exposure, starting at age 16.9 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 16.8 to 17.0) for violence and age 17.2 years (95% CI, 17.0 to 17.4) for sex, and declining to age 13.9 years (95% CI, 13.7 to 14.1) for violence and 14.0 years (95% CI, 13.7 to 14.3) for sex. Parents also reported increasing willingness to allow their target child to view the movies as exposures progressed. Desensitization was observed across parent and child characteristics, violence toward both human and non-human victims, and movie rating. Those who frequently watched movies were more readily desensitized to violence. CONCLUSIONS: Parents become desensitized to both violence and sex in movies, which may contribute to the increasing acceptance of both types of content by both parents and the raters employed by the film industry.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)877-884
JournalPediatrics
Volume134
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Motion Pictures
Violence
Parents
Confidence Intervals
Psychologic Desensitization
Surgical Instruments
Industry
Age Groups
History

Cite this

Romer, D., Jamieson, P. E., Bushman, B. J., Bleakley, A., Wang, A., Langleben, D., & Jamieson, K. H. (2014). Parental desensitization to violence and sex in movies. Pediatrics, 134(5), 877-884. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2014-1167
Romer, D. ; Jamieson, P.E. ; Bushman, B.J. ; Bleakley, A. ; Wang, A. ; Langleben, D. ; Jamieson, K.H. / Parental desensitization to violence and sex in movies. In: Pediatrics. 2014 ; Vol. 134, No. 5. pp. 877-884.
@article{e162e21854a34897abedc62067d6c4ef,
title = "Parental desensitization to violence and sex in movies",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To assess desensitization in parents' repeated exposure to violence and sex in movies. METHODS: A national US sample of 1000 parents living with at least 1 target child in 1 of 3 age groups (6 to 17 years old) viewed a random sequence of 3 pairs of short scenes with either violent or sexual content from popular movies that were unrestricted to youth audiences (rated PG-13 or unrated) or restricted to those under age 17 years without adult supervision (rated R). Parents indicated the minimum age they would consider appropriate to view each film. Predictors included order of presentation, parent and child characteristics, and parent movie viewing history. RESULTS: As exposure to successive clips progressed, parents supported younger ages of appropriate exposure, starting at age 16.9 years (95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 16.8 to 17.0) for violence and age 17.2 years (95{\%} CI, 17.0 to 17.4) for sex, and declining to age 13.9 years (95{\%} CI, 13.7 to 14.1) for violence and 14.0 years (95{\%} CI, 13.7 to 14.3) for sex. Parents also reported increasing willingness to allow their target child to view the movies as exposures progressed. Desensitization was observed across parent and child characteristics, violence toward both human and non-human victims, and movie rating. Those who frequently watched movies were more readily desensitized to violence. CONCLUSIONS: Parents become desensitized to both violence and sex in movies, which may contribute to the increasing acceptance of both types of content by both parents and the raters employed by the film industry.",
author = "D. Romer and P.E. Jamieson and B.J. Bushman and A. Bleakley and A. Wang and D. Langleben and K.H. Jamieson",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1542/peds.2014-1167",
language = "English",
volume = "134",
pages = "877--884",
journal = "Pediatrics",
issn = "0031-4005",
publisher = "American Academy of Pediatrics",
number = "5",

}

Romer, D, Jamieson, PE, Bushman, BJ, Bleakley, A, Wang, A, Langleben, D & Jamieson, KH 2014, 'Parental desensitization to violence and sex in movies' Pediatrics, vol. 134, no. 5, pp. 877-884. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2014-1167

Parental desensitization to violence and sex in movies. / Romer, D.; Jamieson, P.E.; Bushman, B.J.; Bleakley, A.; Wang, A.; Langleben, D.; Jamieson, K.H.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 134, No. 5, 2014, p. 877-884.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Parental desensitization to violence and sex in movies

AU - Romer, D.

AU - Jamieson, P.E.

AU - Bushman, B.J.

AU - Bleakley, A.

AU - Wang, A.

AU - Langleben, D.

AU - Jamieson, K.H.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - OBJECTIVES: To assess desensitization in parents' repeated exposure to violence and sex in movies. METHODS: A national US sample of 1000 parents living with at least 1 target child in 1 of 3 age groups (6 to 17 years old) viewed a random sequence of 3 pairs of short scenes with either violent or sexual content from popular movies that were unrestricted to youth audiences (rated PG-13 or unrated) or restricted to those under age 17 years without adult supervision (rated R). Parents indicated the minimum age they would consider appropriate to view each film. Predictors included order of presentation, parent and child characteristics, and parent movie viewing history. RESULTS: As exposure to successive clips progressed, parents supported younger ages of appropriate exposure, starting at age 16.9 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 16.8 to 17.0) for violence and age 17.2 years (95% CI, 17.0 to 17.4) for sex, and declining to age 13.9 years (95% CI, 13.7 to 14.1) for violence and 14.0 years (95% CI, 13.7 to 14.3) for sex. Parents also reported increasing willingness to allow their target child to view the movies as exposures progressed. Desensitization was observed across parent and child characteristics, violence toward both human and non-human victims, and movie rating. Those who frequently watched movies were more readily desensitized to violence. CONCLUSIONS: Parents become desensitized to both violence and sex in movies, which may contribute to the increasing acceptance of both types of content by both parents and the raters employed by the film industry.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To assess desensitization in parents' repeated exposure to violence and sex in movies. METHODS: A national US sample of 1000 parents living with at least 1 target child in 1 of 3 age groups (6 to 17 years old) viewed a random sequence of 3 pairs of short scenes with either violent or sexual content from popular movies that were unrestricted to youth audiences (rated PG-13 or unrated) or restricted to those under age 17 years without adult supervision (rated R). Parents indicated the minimum age they would consider appropriate to view each film. Predictors included order of presentation, parent and child characteristics, and parent movie viewing history. RESULTS: As exposure to successive clips progressed, parents supported younger ages of appropriate exposure, starting at age 16.9 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 16.8 to 17.0) for violence and age 17.2 years (95% CI, 17.0 to 17.4) for sex, and declining to age 13.9 years (95% CI, 13.7 to 14.1) for violence and 14.0 years (95% CI, 13.7 to 14.3) for sex. Parents also reported increasing willingness to allow their target child to view the movies as exposures progressed. Desensitization was observed across parent and child characteristics, violence toward both human and non-human victims, and movie rating. Those who frequently watched movies were more readily desensitized to violence. CONCLUSIONS: Parents become desensitized to both violence and sex in movies, which may contribute to the increasing acceptance of both types of content by both parents and the raters employed by the film industry.

U2 - 10.1542/peds.2014-1167

DO - 10.1542/peds.2014-1167

M3 - Article

VL - 134

SP - 877

EP - 884

JO - Pediatrics

JF - Pediatrics

SN - 0031-4005

IS - 5

ER -

Romer D, Jamieson PE, Bushman BJ, Bleakley A, Wang A, Langleben D et al. Parental desensitization to violence and sex in movies. Pediatrics. 2014;134(5):877-884. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2014-1167