Parenting stress and child behaviour problems among parents with intellectual disabilities: the buffering role of resources

H.M. Meppelder, M.W. Hodes, S. Kef, C. Schuengel

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Parents with intellectual disabilities (ID) are at risk for high levels of parenting stress. The present study evaluated resources, including parental adaptive functioning, financial resources and access to a support network, as moderators of the association between child behaviour problems and parenting stress. Method: A total of 134 parents with ID and their children (ages 1-7 years) were recruited from 10 Dutch care organisations. Questionnaires were administered to the parents to obtain information on parenting stress in the parent and child domain, financial resources and their support network. Teachers and care workers reported on child behaviour problems and parental adaptive functioning, respectively. Results: Parents experienced more stress with regard to their children than towards their own functioning and situation. Parenting stress was less in parents who were not experiencing financial hardship. Child behaviour problems were associated with high child-related parenting stress, not parent-related parenting stress. Large support networks decreased the association between child behaviour problems and child-related parenting stress. Financial resources did not significantly moderate the association. Conclusions: Parenting stress among parents with ID is focused on problems with the child, especially when little social support is available.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)664-677
JournalJournal of Intellectual Disability Research
Volume59
Issue number7
Early online date4 Dec 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Parenting
Child Behavior
Intellectual Disability
Parents
Resources
Behavior Problems
Social Support
Organizations

Cite this

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title = "Parenting stress and child behaviour problems among parents with intellectual disabilities: the buffering role of resources",
abstract = "Background: Parents with intellectual disabilities (ID) are at risk for high levels of parenting stress. The present study evaluated resources, including parental adaptive functioning, financial resources and access to a support network, as moderators of the association between child behaviour problems and parenting stress. Method: A total of 134 parents with ID and their children (ages 1-7 years) were recruited from 10 Dutch care organisations. Questionnaires were administered to the parents to obtain information on parenting stress in the parent and child domain, financial resources and their support network. Teachers and care workers reported on child behaviour problems and parental adaptive functioning, respectively. Results: Parents experienced more stress with regard to their children than towards their own functioning and situation. Parenting stress was less in parents who were not experiencing financial hardship. Child behaviour problems were associated with high child-related parenting stress, not parent-related parenting stress. Large support networks decreased the association between child behaviour problems and child-related parenting stress. Financial resources did not significantly moderate the association. Conclusions: Parenting stress among parents with ID is focused on problems with the child, especially when little social support is available.",
author = "H.M. Meppelder and M.W. Hodes and S. Kef and C. Schuengel",
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Parenting stress and child behaviour problems among parents with intellectual disabilities: the buffering role of resources. / Meppelder, H.M.; Hodes, M.W.; Kef, S.; Schuengel, C.

In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, Vol. 59, No. 7, 2015, p. 664-677.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Parenting stress and child behaviour problems among parents with intellectual disabilities: the buffering role of resources

AU - Meppelder, H.M.

AU - Hodes, M.W.

AU - Kef, S.

AU - Schuengel, C.

PY - 2015

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N2 - Background: Parents with intellectual disabilities (ID) are at risk for high levels of parenting stress. The present study evaluated resources, including parental adaptive functioning, financial resources and access to a support network, as moderators of the association between child behaviour problems and parenting stress. Method: A total of 134 parents with ID and their children (ages 1-7 years) were recruited from 10 Dutch care organisations. Questionnaires were administered to the parents to obtain information on parenting stress in the parent and child domain, financial resources and their support network. Teachers and care workers reported on child behaviour problems and parental adaptive functioning, respectively. Results: Parents experienced more stress with regard to their children than towards their own functioning and situation. Parenting stress was less in parents who were not experiencing financial hardship. Child behaviour problems were associated with high child-related parenting stress, not parent-related parenting stress. Large support networks decreased the association between child behaviour problems and child-related parenting stress. Financial resources did not significantly moderate the association. Conclusions: Parenting stress among parents with ID is focused on problems with the child, especially when little social support is available.

AB - Background: Parents with intellectual disabilities (ID) are at risk for high levels of parenting stress. The present study evaluated resources, including parental adaptive functioning, financial resources and access to a support network, as moderators of the association between child behaviour problems and parenting stress. Method: A total of 134 parents with ID and their children (ages 1-7 years) were recruited from 10 Dutch care organisations. Questionnaires were administered to the parents to obtain information on parenting stress in the parent and child domain, financial resources and their support network. Teachers and care workers reported on child behaviour problems and parental adaptive functioning, respectively. Results: Parents experienced more stress with regard to their children than towards their own functioning and situation. Parenting stress was less in parents who were not experiencing financial hardship. Child behaviour problems were associated with high child-related parenting stress, not parent-related parenting stress. Large support networks decreased the association between child behaviour problems and child-related parenting stress. Financial resources did not significantly moderate the association. Conclusions: Parenting stress among parents with ID is focused on problems with the child, especially when little social support is available.

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