Past, present and future: How the Lithuanian Diaspora in the Netherlands accumulates human capital from social capital

J.E. Ferguson, E. Salominaite, F.K. Boersma

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This paper explains how social capital activates the accumulation of human capital within a Diaspora context. Our study focused on migrants in the Lithuanian Diaspora and revealed unexpected differences in the way low- and high-skilled migrants developed and applied social capital in order to accumulate human capital. Namely, despite a less privileged point of departure, low-skilled Lithuanians appeared stronger in developing new social networks, and were more driven to strengthen their human capital than high-skilled migrants. The study provides novel empirical and theoretical insights by explaining the significance of social capital in the accumulation of human capital among Diaspora communities. In so doing, the study provides important insights for integration policy development for immigrant-receiving countries, offering a different perspective on high- and low-skilled migrant mobility and integration intentions.
LanguageEnglish
Pages2205-2225
JournalJournal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Volume42
Issue number13
Early online date4 Apr 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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diaspora
human capital
social capital
Netherlands
migrant
present
integration policy
social network
immigrant
Social Capital
Diaspora
Human Capital
Migrants
The Netherlands
community

Cite this

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Past, present and future: How the Lithuanian Diaspora in the Netherlands accumulates human capital from social capital. / Ferguson, J.E.; Salominaite, E.; Boersma, F.K.

In: Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Vol. 42, No. 13, 2016, p. 2205-2225.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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