Past temperature and d18O of surface ocean waters inferred from foraminiferal Mg/Ca ratios.

H. Elderfield, G.M. Ganssen

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Determining the past record of temperature and salinity of ocean surface waters is essential for understanding past changes in climate, such as those which occur across glacial-interglacial transitions. As a useful proxy, the oxygen isotope composition (δ
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)442-445
JournalNature
Volume405
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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interglacial
oxygen isotope
sea surface
surface water
salinity
climate
temperature
water

Cite this

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title = "Past temperature and d18O of surface ocean waters inferred from foraminiferal Mg/Ca ratios.",
abstract = "Determining the past record of temperature and salinity of ocean surface waters is essential for understanding past changes in climate, such as those which occur across glacial-interglacial transitions. As a useful proxy, the oxygen isotope composition (δ",
author = "H. Elderfield and G.M. Ganssen",
year = "2000",
doi = "10.1038/35013033",
language = "English",
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pages = "442--445",
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Past temperature and d18O of surface ocean waters inferred from foraminiferal Mg/Ca ratios. / Elderfield, H.; Ganssen, G.M.

In: Nature, Vol. 405, 2000, p. 442-445.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Past temperature and d18O of surface ocean waters inferred from foraminiferal Mg/Ca ratios.

AU - Elderfield, H.

AU - Ganssen, G.M.

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N2 - Determining the past record of temperature and salinity of ocean surface waters is essential for understanding past changes in climate, such as those which occur across glacial-interglacial transitions. As a useful proxy, the oxygen isotope composition (δ

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DO - 10.1038/35013033

M3 - Article

VL - 405

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JO - Nature

JF - Nature

SN - 0028-0836

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