Political Ideology, Trust, and Cooperation: In-group Favoritism among Republicans and Democrats during a US National Election

Daniel Balliet*, Joshua M. Tybur, Junhui Wu, Christian Antonellis, Paul A.M. Van Lange

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Theories suggest that political ideology relates to cooperation, with conservatives being more likely to pursue selfish outcomes, and liberals more likely to pursue egalitarian outcomes. In study 1, we examine how political ideology and political party affiliation (Republican vs. Democrat) predict cooperation with a partner who self-identifies as Republican or Democrat in two samples before (n = 362) and after (n = 366) the 2012 US presidential election. Liberals show slightly more concern for their partners’ outcomes compared to conservatives (study 1), and in study 2 this relation is supported by a meta-analysis (r =.15). However, in study 1, political ideology did not relate to cooperation in general. Both Republicans and Democrats extend more cooperation to their in-group relative to the out-group, and this is explained by expectations of cooperation from in-group versus out-group members. We discuss the relation between political ideology and cooperation within and between groups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)797-818
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of conflict resolution
Volume62
Issue number4
Early online date21 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2018

Keywords

  • cooperation
  • in-group favoritism
  • political ideology
  • right-wing authoritarianism
  • social dominance orientation
  • trust

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