Polygenic risk for alcohol consumption and its association with alcohol-related phenotypes: Do stress and life satisfaction moderate these relationships?

Gabry W Mies, Karin J H Verweij, Jorien L Treur, Lannie Ligthart, Iryna O Fedko, Jouke Jan Hottenga, Gonneke Willemsen, Meike Bartels, Dorret I Boomsma, Jacqueline M Vink

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Genetic and environmental factors contribute about equally to alcohol-related phenotypes in adulthood. In the present study, we examined whether more stress at home or low satisfaction with life might be associated with heavier drinking or more alcohol-related problems in individuals with a high genetic susceptibility to alcohol use.

METHODS: Information on polygenic scores and drinking behavior was available in 6705 adults (65% female; 18-83 years) registered with the Netherlands Twin Register. Polygenic risk scores (PRSs) were constructed for all subjects based on the summary statistics of a large genome-wide association meta-analysis on alcohol consumption (grams per day). Outcome measures were quantity of alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems assessed with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Stress at home and life satisfaction were moderating variables whose significance was tested by Generalized Estimating Equation analyses taking familial relatedness, age and sex into account.

RESULTS: PRSs for alcohol were significantly associated with quantity of alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems in the past year (R2=0.11% and 0.10% respectively). Participants who reported to have experienced more stress in the past year and lower life satisfaction, scored higher on alcohol-related problems (R2=0.27% and 0.29 respectively), but not on alcohol consumption. Stress and life satisfaction did not moderate the association between PRSs and the alcohol outcome measures.

CONCLUSIONS: There were significant main effects of polygenic scores and of stress and life satisfaction on drinking behavior, but there was no support for PRS-by-stress or PRS-by-life satisfaction interactions on alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems.

LanguageEnglish
Pages7-12
Number of pages6
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume183
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

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Psychological Stress
Alcohol Drinking
Alcohols
Phenotype
Drinking Behavior
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Netherlands
Drinking
Meta-Analysis
Genes

Keywords

  • Journal Article

Cite this

@article{e6aea4ab05d1449a95b06810f5ae42ad,
title = "Polygenic risk for alcohol consumption and its association with alcohol-related phenotypes: Do stress and life satisfaction moderate these relationships?",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Genetic and environmental factors contribute about equally to alcohol-related phenotypes in adulthood. In the present study, we examined whether more stress at home or low satisfaction with life might be associated with heavier drinking or more alcohol-related problems in individuals with a high genetic susceptibility to alcohol use.METHODS: Information on polygenic scores and drinking behavior was available in 6705 adults (65{\%} female; 18-83 years) registered with the Netherlands Twin Register. Polygenic risk scores (PRSs) were constructed for all subjects based on the summary statistics of a large genome-wide association meta-analysis on alcohol consumption (grams per day). Outcome measures were quantity of alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems assessed with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Stress at home and life satisfaction were moderating variables whose significance was tested by Generalized Estimating Equation analyses taking familial relatedness, age and sex into account.RESULTS: PRSs for alcohol were significantly associated with quantity of alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems in the past year (R2=0.11{\%} and 0.10{\%} respectively). Participants who reported to have experienced more stress in the past year and lower life satisfaction, scored higher on alcohol-related problems (R2=0.27{\%} and 0.29 respectively), but not on alcohol consumption. Stress and life satisfaction did not moderate the association between PRSs and the alcohol outcome measures.CONCLUSIONS: There were significant main effects of polygenic scores and of stress and life satisfaction on drinking behavior, but there was no support for PRS-by-stress or PRS-by-life satisfaction interactions on alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Mies, {Gabry W} and Verweij, {Karin J H} and Treur, {Jorien L} and Lannie Ligthart and Fedko, {Iryna O} and Hottenga, {Jouke Jan} and Gonneke Willemsen and Meike Bartels and Boomsma, {Dorret I} and Vink, {Jacqueline M}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.10.018",
language = "English",
volume = "183",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Polygenic risk for alcohol consumption and its association with alcohol-related phenotypes

T2 - Drug and Alcohol Dependence

AU - Mies, Gabry W

AU - Verweij, Karin J H

AU - Treur, Jorien L

AU - Ligthart, Lannie

AU - Fedko, Iryna O

AU - Hottenga, Jouke Jan

AU - Willemsen, Gonneke

AU - Bartels, Meike

AU - Boomsma, Dorret I

AU - Vink, Jacqueline M

N1 - Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Genetic and environmental factors contribute about equally to alcohol-related phenotypes in adulthood. In the present study, we examined whether more stress at home or low satisfaction with life might be associated with heavier drinking or more alcohol-related problems in individuals with a high genetic susceptibility to alcohol use.METHODS: Information on polygenic scores and drinking behavior was available in 6705 adults (65% female; 18-83 years) registered with the Netherlands Twin Register. Polygenic risk scores (PRSs) were constructed for all subjects based on the summary statistics of a large genome-wide association meta-analysis on alcohol consumption (grams per day). Outcome measures were quantity of alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems assessed with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Stress at home and life satisfaction were moderating variables whose significance was tested by Generalized Estimating Equation analyses taking familial relatedness, age and sex into account.RESULTS: PRSs for alcohol were significantly associated with quantity of alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems in the past year (R2=0.11% and 0.10% respectively). Participants who reported to have experienced more stress in the past year and lower life satisfaction, scored higher on alcohol-related problems (R2=0.27% and 0.29 respectively), but not on alcohol consumption. Stress and life satisfaction did not moderate the association between PRSs and the alcohol outcome measures.CONCLUSIONS: There were significant main effects of polygenic scores and of stress and life satisfaction on drinking behavior, but there was no support for PRS-by-stress or PRS-by-life satisfaction interactions on alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems.

AB - BACKGROUND: Genetic and environmental factors contribute about equally to alcohol-related phenotypes in adulthood. In the present study, we examined whether more stress at home or low satisfaction with life might be associated with heavier drinking or more alcohol-related problems in individuals with a high genetic susceptibility to alcohol use.METHODS: Information on polygenic scores and drinking behavior was available in 6705 adults (65% female; 18-83 years) registered with the Netherlands Twin Register. Polygenic risk scores (PRSs) were constructed for all subjects based on the summary statistics of a large genome-wide association meta-analysis on alcohol consumption (grams per day). Outcome measures were quantity of alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems assessed with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Stress at home and life satisfaction were moderating variables whose significance was tested by Generalized Estimating Equation analyses taking familial relatedness, age and sex into account.RESULTS: PRSs for alcohol were significantly associated with quantity of alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems in the past year (R2=0.11% and 0.10% respectively). Participants who reported to have experienced more stress in the past year and lower life satisfaction, scored higher on alcohol-related problems (R2=0.27% and 0.29 respectively), but not on alcohol consumption. Stress and life satisfaction did not moderate the association between PRSs and the alcohol outcome measures.CONCLUSIONS: There were significant main effects of polygenic scores and of stress and life satisfaction on drinking behavior, but there was no support for PRS-by-stress or PRS-by-life satisfaction interactions on alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.10.018

DO - 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.10.018

M3 - Article

VL - 183

SP - 7

EP - 12

JO - Drug and Alcohol Dependence

JF - Drug and Alcohol Dependence

SN - 0376-8716

ER -