Prescription of antipsychotic medication to patients at ultra high risk of developing psychosis

D.H. Nieman, H.E. Becker, P.M. Dingemans, T.A. van Amelsvoort, L. Haan, M. van der Gaag, D.A.J.P. Denys, D.H. Linszen

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Abstract

Little is known about medication prescription in a naturalistic setting to patients at ultra high risk (UHR) of developing psychosis. Antipsychotic medication prescription to UHR patients is not recommended in clinical practice guidelines based on the current evidence. The aim of this study is to investigate medication prescription to UHR patients in the Netherlands. The frequency of antipsychotic medication prescription to UHR patients (n=72) was compared with the frequency of antipsychotic medication prescription to patients who were diagnosed with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition psychotic disorder at first diagnostic evaluation (n=90). Within the UHR group, frequency of antipsychotic medication prescription at baseline was compared between UHR patients who did make the transition to psychosis (n=18) and UHR patients who did not (n=54). No significant differences were found in antipsychotic medication prescription to UHR patients and to patients who turned out to have a florid psychosis: 51% in the psychotic group and 58% in the UHR group used no medication. Thirty-four percent in the psychotic group and 21% in the UHR group used antipsychotic medication. There was also no difference in medication prescription between UHR patients who did and did not make the transition to psychosis. More research should be aimed at developing and implementing clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of UHR patients.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)223-228
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Clinical Psychopharmacology
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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