Presenting News on Social Media: Media logic in the communication style of newspapers on Facebook

Kasper Welbers, Michaël Opgenhaffen

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

With the rising popularity of social media as news sources, a new common format element for presenting news has emerged: in addition to the classic headline, lead and picture, news organizations add a status message when they share their news articles on social media such as Twitter and Facebook. Based on media logic theory, we argue that the communication style of these messages is likely to be more interpersonal and subjective. To investigate this we used computational text analysis to compare status messages to headlines and leads, covering nine newspapers from the Netherlands and Flanders over a period of 2.5 years. We conclude that newspapers use status messages to add a subjective expression to news on social media, and call for research into how this takes shape and affects the audience.

LanguageEnglish
Pages45–62
Number of pages18
JournalDigital Journalism
Volume7
Issue number1
Early online date5 Oct 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Fingerprint

facebook
social media
newspaper
news
Lead
communication
Communication
text analysis
twitter
popularity
Netherlands

Keywords

  • computational analysis
  • emotion
  • Facebook
  • news headlines
  • social media logic
  • subjectivity

Cite this

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Presenting News on Social Media : Media logic in the communication style of newspapers on Facebook. / Welbers, Kasper; Opgenhaffen, Michaël.

In: Digital Journalism, Vol. 7, No. 1, 2019, p. 45–62.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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