Procedural justice and the hedonic principle: How approach versus avoidance motivation influences the psychology of voice

J.W. van Prooijen, J.C.T.M. Karremans, I. van Beest

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    Abstract

    The authors investigate the relation between the hedonic principle (people's motivations to approach pleasure and to avoid pain) and procedural justice. They explore whether approach or avoidance motivation increases the effect that people feel they were treated more fairly following procedures that do versus do not allow them an opportunity to voice their opinion. Experiments 1 and 2 reveal that these procedures influence procedural justice judgments more strongly when people conduct approach motor action (arm flexion) than when they conduct avoidance motor action (arm extension). Experiment 3 indicates that individual-difference measures of participants' approach motivations predicted procedural justice judgments following voice versus no-voice procedures. The authors conclude that people's motivational orientations stimulate their fairness-based reactions to voice procedures. Copyright 2006 by the American Psychological Association.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)686-697
    Number of pages11
    JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
    Volume91
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

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