Process-orientation versus outcome-orientation during organizational change: The role of organizational identification

B.M. van Knippenberg, L. Martin, T. Tyler

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    Abstract

    In this paper we argue that organizational identification is predictive of employee interests and concerns during periods of organizational change. More specifically, we assert that organizational identification may largely determine whether employees may be focused upon the change related outcomes (e.g., salary, expenses, etc.), or on the change processes (e.g., procedures, voice and participation options, etc.). Data of both a scenario experiment and a survey are presented indicating that high and low identifiers indeed are differentially interested in process and outcome information. The results suggest that people who identify less with the organization are more likely to be focused upon the change outcomes then on the change process, while people who identify highly (i.e., deep structure) with the organization are more likely to be focused upon the change processes then on the change outcomes. The benefits of awareness of organizational members' level of identification for organizational change management are discussed. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)685-704
    JournalJournal of Organizational Behavior
    Volume27
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

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