Processing different degrees of logo change When higher levels of brand consciousness decrease openness to substantial logo changes

B. van Grinsven, E. Das

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose – This paper aims to develop an experimental paradigm to assess effects of degrees of logo change on logo processing speed to provide rigid tests of the effects of objectified degrees of logo changes and to understand how degrees of logo change interact with consumer and market conditions. Design/methodology/approach – Experiment 1 (N = 120) used a 3 (degree of change: no vs small vs substantial change) unifactorial between-subjects design to develop the experimental paradigm for the effects of degrees of logo change. Experiment 2 (N = 148) examined effects of brand consciousness and exposure in a 3 (degree of change: original vs small vs substantial change) × 2 (exposure: 1 vs 3 exposures) between-subjects design with brand consciousness as a continuous moderator to extend the paradigm to a more naturalistic marketing communication setting. Findings – Substantial logo changes harmed processing speed of highly brand conscious consumers in particular. Furthermore, substantial logo changes decreased processing speed, which was compensated by repeated exposure to the redesigned brand logo. Practical implications – The findings suggest that brand consciousness creates a tunnel vision, which impairs openness to changes in brand image. Furthermore, the findings imply that brand logos can be (substantially) changed without hurting logo processing speed: only a few exposures are needed to neutralize these effects. Originality/value – This is the first study that provides rigid tests of objectified degrees of logo changes, extended to a more naturalistic marketing communication setting, by examining brand consciousness and exposure effects.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1710-1727
JournalEuropean Journal of Marketing
Volume49
Issue number11-12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Bibliographical note

PT: J; NR: 49; TC: 0; J9: EUR J MARKETING; PG: 18; GA: CY6CN; UT: WOS:000366494900001

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