Proprioception of the shoulder after stroke

M.H.M. Niessen, H.E.J. Veeger, P.A. Koppe, M. Konijnenbelt, J.H. van Dieen

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    Niessen MH, Veeger DH, Koppe PA, Konijnenbelt MH, van Dieën J, Janssen TW. Proprioception of the shoulder after stroke. Objective: To investigate position sense and kinesthesia of the shoulders of stroke patients. Design: Case-control study. Setting: A rehabilitation center. Participants: A total of 22 inpatients with stroke and 10 healthy control subjects. Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: Angular displacement (in degrees) for threshold to detection of passive motion (TDPM) tests and absolute error (in degrees) for passive reproduction of joint position tests. Results: For patients, the TDPM for internal and external rotation was significantly higher for both the contralateral (paretic) side (internal, 7.92°±7.19°; external, 8.46°±8.87°) and the ipsilateral (nonparetic) side (internal, 4.86°±5.03°; external, 6.09°±9.15°) compared with the control group (internal, 1.83°±1.09°; external, 1.71°±.85°). Also, for internal rotation, TDPM was significantly higher for patients on the contralateral side compared with the ipsilateral side. For passive reproduction of joint position tests, no differences were found. Conclusions: Both the contralateral and ipsilateral shoulders of stroke patients showed impaired TDPM. Passive reproduction of joint position does not seem to be affected as a result of a stroke. The control of the muscle spindles and central integration or processing problems of the afferent signals provided by muscle spindles might cause these effects. © 2008 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)333-338
    JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
    Volume89
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

    Fingerprint

    Proprioception
    Stroke
    Reproduction
    Muscle Spindles
    Joints
    Kinesthesis
    Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
    Rehabilitation Centers
    Case-Control Studies
    Inpatients
    Healthy Volunteers
    Rehabilitation
    Medicine
    Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
    Control Groups

    Cite this

    Niessen, M.H.M. ; Veeger, H.E.J. ; Koppe, P.A. ; Konijnenbelt, M. ; van Dieen, J.H. / Proprioception of the shoulder after stroke. In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2008 ; Vol. 89, No. 2. pp. 333-338.
    @article{c192da96f3fe456398c5dc6b19aa9813,
    title = "Proprioception of the shoulder after stroke",
    abstract = "Niessen MH, Veeger DH, Koppe PA, Konijnenbelt MH, van Die{\"e}n J, Janssen TW. Proprioception of the shoulder after stroke. Objective: To investigate position sense and kinesthesia of the shoulders of stroke patients. Design: Case-control study. Setting: A rehabilitation center. Participants: A total of 22 inpatients with stroke and 10 healthy control subjects. Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: Angular displacement (in degrees) for threshold to detection of passive motion (TDPM) tests and absolute error (in degrees) for passive reproduction of joint position tests. Results: For patients, the TDPM for internal and external rotation was significantly higher for both the contralateral (paretic) side (internal, 7.92°±7.19°; external, 8.46°±8.87°) and the ipsilateral (nonparetic) side (internal, 4.86°±5.03°; external, 6.09°±9.15°) compared with the control group (internal, 1.83°±1.09°; external, 1.71°±.85°). Also, for internal rotation, TDPM was significantly higher for patients on the contralateral side compared with the ipsilateral side. For passive reproduction of joint position tests, no differences were found. Conclusions: Both the contralateral and ipsilateral shoulders of stroke patients showed impaired TDPM. Passive reproduction of joint position does not seem to be affected as a result of a stroke. The control of the muscle spindles and central integration or processing problems of the afferent signals provided by muscle spindles might cause these effects. {\circledC} 2008 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.",
    author = "M.H.M. Niessen and H.E.J. Veeger and P.A. Koppe and M. Konijnenbelt and {van Dieen}, J.H.",
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    Proprioception of the shoulder after stroke. / Niessen, M.H.M.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Koppe, P.A.; Konijnenbelt, M.; van Dieen, J.H.

    In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 89, No. 2, 2008, p. 333-338.

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Proprioception of the shoulder after stroke

    AU - Niessen, M.H.M.

    AU - Veeger, H.E.J.

    AU - Koppe, P.A.

    AU - Konijnenbelt, M.

    AU - van Dieen, J.H.

    PY - 2008

    Y1 - 2008

    N2 - Niessen MH, Veeger DH, Koppe PA, Konijnenbelt MH, van Dieën J, Janssen TW. Proprioception of the shoulder after stroke. Objective: To investigate position sense and kinesthesia of the shoulders of stroke patients. Design: Case-control study. Setting: A rehabilitation center. Participants: A total of 22 inpatients with stroke and 10 healthy control subjects. Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: Angular displacement (in degrees) for threshold to detection of passive motion (TDPM) tests and absolute error (in degrees) for passive reproduction of joint position tests. Results: For patients, the TDPM for internal and external rotation was significantly higher for both the contralateral (paretic) side (internal, 7.92°±7.19°; external, 8.46°±8.87°) and the ipsilateral (nonparetic) side (internal, 4.86°±5.03°; external, 6.09°±9.15°) compared with the control group (internal, 1.83°±1.09°; external, 1.71°±.85°). Also, for internal rotation, TDPM was significantly higher for patients on the contralateral side compared with the ipsilateral side. For passive reproduction of joint position tests, no differences were found. Conclusions: Both the contralateral and ipsilateral shoulders of stroke patients showed impaired TDPM. Passive reproduction of joint position does not seem to be affected as a result of a stroke. The control of the muscle spindles and central integration or processing problems of the afferent signals provided by muscle spindles might cause these effects. © 2008 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

    AB - Niessen MH, Veeger DH, Koppe PA, Konijnenbelt MH, van Dieën J, Janssen TW. Proprioception of the shoulder after stroke. Objective: To investigate position sense and kinesthesia of the shoulders of stroke patients. Design: Case-control study. Setting: A rehabilitation center. Participants: A total of 22 inpatients with stroke and 10 healthy control subjects. Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: Angular displacement (in degrees) for threshold to detection of passive motion (TDPM) tests and absolute error (in degrees) for passive reproduction of joint position tests. Results: For patients, the TDPM for internal and external rotation was significantly higher for both the contralateral (paretic) side (internal, 7.92°±7.19°; external, 8.46°±8.87°) and the ipsilateral (nonparetic) side (internal, 4.86°±5.03°; external, 6.09°±9.15°) compared with the control group (internal, 1.83°±1.09°; external, 1.71°±.85°). Also, for internal rotation, TDPM was significantly higher for patients on the contralateral side compared with the ipsilateral side. For passive reproduction of joint position tests, no differences were found. Conclusions: Both the contralateral and ipsilateral shoulders of stroke patients showed impaired TDPM. Passive reproduction of joint position does not seem to be affected as a result of a stroke. The control of the muscle spindles and central integration or processing problems of the afferent signals provided by muscle spindles might cause these effects. © 2008 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

    U2 - 10.1016/j.apmr.2007.08.157

    DO - 10.1016/j.apmr.2007.08.157

    M3 - Article

    VL - 89

    SP - 333

    EP - 338

    JO - Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

    JF - Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

    SN - 0003-9993

    IS - 2

    ER -