Randomized clinical trial of short-term compression therapy for short-lasting, aspecific neck pain: a pilot study [Dutch]

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Abstract

Randomized clinical trial of short-term compression therapy for short-lasting, aspecific neck pain: a pilot study OBJECTIVE. To compare the efficacy of short-term compression therapy with that of short-term cervical traction for acute (<3 months) aspecific neck pain. METHODS. Patients with aspecific neck pain, aged 18 to 70 years, were recruited from a private primary care practice. Patients were randomized to the traction and compression groups and received three treatments over 2 weeks. Intensity of pain and stiffness of movement of the neck (Visual Analogue Scale [vas]), range of motion of cervical spine (Cervical Range Of Motion [CROM]), and activities and participation (Neck Disability Index [NDI]) were measured. RESULTS. Thirty-three patients were included (compression group n=17; traction group n=16). Compression therapy was significantly better than traction therapy in improving mobility of the cervical spine (right lateroflexion [p=0.00; effect size o.84] and flexion [p=0.01; effect size o.85]), and NDI (p=0.02). Compression therapy tended to be better, but not significantly so, than traction therapy in improving the other variables assessed. No adverse effects were reported. CONCLUSION. Short-term compression therapy is a more effective than short-term traction therapy for acute aspecific neck pain, especially in terms of mobility of the neck and activities and participation. This abstract was translated into English by the publisher or author.
Original languageDutch
Pages (from-to)2-7
Number of pages6
JournalNederlands Tijdschrift voor Fysiotherapie
Volume116
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Keywords

  • Compression Therapy -- Evaluation Neck Pain -- Reh

Cite this

@article{693fe90bfdd348ef88fd14cdb2ba7b4a,
title = "Randomized clinical trial of short-term compression therapy for short-lasting, aspecific neck pain: a pilot study [Dutch]",
abstract = "Randomized clinical trial of short-term compression therapy for short-lasting, aspecific neck pain: a pilot study OBJECTIVE. To compare the efficacy of short-term compression therapy with that of short-term cervical traction for acute (<3 months) aspecific neck pain. METHODS. Patients with aspecific neck pain, aged 18 to 70 years, were recruited from a private primary care practice. Patients were randomized to the traction and compression groups and received three treatments over 2 weeks. Intensity of pain and stiffness of movement of the neck (Visual Analogue Scale [vas]), range of motion of cervical spine (Cervical Range Of Motion [CROM]), and activities and participation (Neck Disability Index [NDI]) were measured. RESULTS. Thirty-three patients were included (compression group n=17; traction group n=16). Compression therapy was significantly better than traction therapy in improving mobility of the cervical spine (right lateroflexion [p=0.00; effect size o.84] and flexion [p=0.01; effect size o.85]), and NDI (p=0.02). Compression therapy tended to be better, but not significantly so, than traction therapy in improving the other variables assessed. No adverse effects were reported. CONCLUSION. Short-term compression therapy is a more effective than short-term traction therapy for acute aspecific neck pain, especially in terms of mobility of the neck and activities and participation. This abstract was translated into English by the publisher or author.",
keywords = "Compression Therapy -- Evaluation Neck Pain -- Reh",
author = "A Pattyn and Scholten-Peeters, {G G M} and W Duquet and Oostendorp, {R A B}",
year = "2006",
language = "Dutch",
volume = "116",
pages = "2--7",
journal = "Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Fysiotherapie",
issn = "0377-208X",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Randomized clinical trial of short-term compression therapy for short-lasting, aspecific neck pain: a pilot study [Dutch]

AU - Pattyn, A

AU - Scholten-Peeters, G G M

AU - Duquet, W

AU - Oostendorp, R A B

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - Randomized clinical trial of short-term compression therapy for short-lasting, aspecific neck pain: a pilot study OBJECTIVE. To compare the efficacy of short-term compression therapy with that of short-term cervical traction for acute (<3 months) aspecific neck pain. METHODS. Patients with aspecific neck pain, aged 18 to 70 years, were recruited from a private primary care practice. Patients were randomized to the traction and compression groups and received three treatments over 2 weeks. Intensity of pain and stiffness of movement of the neck (Visual Analogue Scale [vas]), range of motion of cervical spine (Cervical Range Of Motion [CROM]), and activities and participation (Neck Disability Index [NDI]) were measured. RESULTS. Thirty-three patients were included (compression group n=17; traction group n=16). Compression therapy was significantly better than traction therapy in improving mobility of the cervical spine (right lateroflexion [p=0.00; effect size o.84] and flexion [p=0.01; effect size o.85]), and NDI (p=0.02). Compression therapy tended to be better, but not significantly so, than traction therapy in improving the other variables assessed. No adverse effects were reported. CONCLUSION. Short-term compression therapy is a more effective than short-term traction therapy for acute aspecific neck pain, especially in terms of mobility of the neck and activities and participation. This abstract was translated into English by the publisher or author.

AB - Randomized clinical trial of short-term compression therapy for short-lasting, aspecific neck pain: a pilot study OBJECTIVE. To compare the efficacy of short-term compression therapy with that of short-term cervical traction for acute (<3 months) aspecific neck pain. METHODS. Patients with aspecific neck pain, aged 18 to 70 years, were recruited from a private primary care practice. Patients were randomized to the traction and compression groups and received three treatments over 2 weeks. Intensity of pain and stiffness of movement of the neck (Visual Analogue Scale [vas]), range of motion of cervical spine (Cervical Range Of Motion [CROM]), and activities and participation (Neck Disability Index [NDI]) were measured. RESULTS. Thirty-three patients were included (compression group n=17; traction group n=16). Compression therapy was significantly better than traction therapy in improving mobility of the cervical spine (right lateroflexion [p=0.00; effect size o.84] and flexion [p=0.01; effect size o.85]), and NDI (p=0.02). Compression therapy tended to be better, but not significantly so, than traction therapy in improving the other variables assessed. No adverse effects were reported. CONCLUSION. Short-term compression therapy is a more effective than short-term traction therapy for acute aspecific neck pain, especially in terms of mobility of the neck and activities and participation. This abstract was translated into English by the publisher or author.

KW - Compression Therapy -- Evaluation Neck Pain -- Reh

M3 - Article

VL - 116

SP - 2

EP - 7

JO - Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Fysiotherapie

JF - Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Fysiotherapie

SN - 0377-208X

ER -