Ranking the schools: How school-quality information affects school choice in the Netherlands

P.W.C. Koning, K. van der Wiel

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This paper analyzes whether information about the quality of high schools published in a national newspaper affects school choice in the Netherlands. We find that negative (positive) school-quality scores decrease (increase) the number of first-year students who choose a school after the year of publication. These effects are only large for the college-preparatory track, such that a school receiving the most positive score for its most academic track sees 16-18 more first-year students enroll. We find that parents respond to the most recent and most prominently displayed information. The effects of information about school quality do not seem to be greater in regions with larger relevant newspaper circulation, suggesting that direct exposure to news about school quality does not explain the response to this information. © 2013 by the European Economic Association.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)466-493
JournalJournal of the European Economic Association
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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The Netherlands
School quality
School choice
Ranking
Quality information
News
Economics
High school

Cite this

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Ranking the schools: How school-quality information affects school choice in the Netherlands. / Koning, P.W.C.; van der Wiel, K.

In: Journal of the European Economic Association, Vol. 11, No. 2, 2013, p. 466-493.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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