Recovery of cycling gross efficiency after time-trial exercise

Sjors Groot, Lars H.J. Van De Westelaken, Dionne A. Noordhof, Koen Levels, Jos J. De Koning

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Research has shown that gross efficiency (GE) declines during high-intensity exercise, but the time course of recovery of GE after high-intensity exercise has not yet been investigated. Purpose: To determine the time course of the recovery of GE after time trials (TTs) of different lengths. Methods: Nineteen trained male cyclists participated in this study. Before and after TTs of 2000 and 20,000 m, subjects performed submaximal exercise at 55% of the power output attained at maximal oxygen uptake (PVO2max). The postmeasurement continued until 30 min after the end of the TT, during which GE was determined over 3-min intervals. The magnitude-based-inferences approach was used for statistical analysis. Results: GE decreased substantially during the 2000-m and 20,000-m TTs (-11.8% [3.6%] and -6.2% [4.0%], respectively). A most likely and very likely recovery of GE was found during the first half of the submaximal exercise bout performed after the 2000-m, with only a possible increase in GE during the first part of the submaximal exercise bout performed after the 20,000-m. After both distances, GE did not fully recover to the initial pre-TT values, as the difference between the pre-TT value and average GE value of minutes 26-29 was still most likely negative for both the 2000- and 20,000-m (-6.1% [2.8%] and -7.0% [4.5%], respectively). Conclusions: It is impossible to fully recover GE after TTs of 2000- or 20,000-m during 30 min of submaximal cycling exercise performed at an intensity of 55% PVO2max.

LanguageEnglish
Pages1028-1033
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Volume13
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2018

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Keywords

  • Aerobic capacity
  • Economy
  • Fatigue
  • Pacing strategy
  • Performance

Cite this

@article{24e2deae71b049a18d647140a3ad3171,
title = "Recovery of cycling gross efficiency after time-trial exercise",
abstract = "Background: Research has shown that gross efficiency (GE) declines during high-intensity exercise, but the time course of recovery of GE after high-intensity exercise has not yet been investigated. Purpose: To determine the time course of the recovery of GE after time trials (TTs) of different lengths. Methods: Nineteen trained male cyclists participated in this study. Before and after TTs of 2000 and 20,000 m, subjects performed submaximal exercise at 55{\%} of the power output attained at maximal oxygen uptake (PVO2max). The postmeasurement continued until 30 min after the end of the TT, during which GE was determined over 3-min intervals. The magnitude-based-inferences approach was used for statistical analysis. Results: GE decreased substantially during the 2000-m and 20,000-m TTs (-11.8{\%} [3.6{\%}] and -6.2{\%} [4.0{\%}], respectively). A most likely and very likely recovery of GE was found during the first half of the submaximal exercise bout performed after the 2000-m, with only a possible increase in GE during the first part of the submaximal exercise bout performed after the 20,000-m. After both distances, GE did not fully recover to the initial pre-TT values, as the difference between the pre-TT value and average GE value of minutes 26-29 was still most likely negative for both the 2000- and 20,000-m (-6.1{\%} [2.8{\%}] and -7.0{\%} [4.5{\%}], respectively). Conclusions: It is impossible to fully recover GE after TTs of 2000- or 20,000-m during 30 min of submaximal cycling exercise performed at an intensity of 55{\%} PVO2max.",
keywords = "Aerobic capacity, Economy, Fatigue, Pacing strategy, Performance",
author = "Sjors Groot and {Van De Westelaken}, {Lars H.J.} and Noordhof, {Dionne A.} and Koen Levels and {De Koning}, {Jos J.}",
year = "2018",
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}

Recovery of cycling gross efficiency after time-trial exercise. / Groot, Sjors; Van De Westelaken, Lars H.J.; Noordhof, Dionne A.; Levels, Koen; De Koning, Jos J.

In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, Vol. 13, No. 8, 01.09.2018, p. 1028-1033.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Recovery of cycling gross efficiency after time-trial exercise

AU - Groot,Sjors

AU - Van De Westelaken,Lars H.J.

AU - Noordhof,Dionne A.

AU - Levels,Koen

AU - De Koning,Jos J.

PY - 2018/9/1

Y1 - 2018/9/1

N2 - Background: Research has shown that gross efficiency (GE) declines during high-intensity exercise, but the time course of recovery of GE after high-intensity exercise has not yet been investigated. Purpose: To determine the time course of the recovery of GE after time trials (TTs) of different lengths. Methods: Nineteen trained male cyclists participated in this study. Before and after TTs of 2000 and 20,000 m, subjects performed submaximal exercise at 55% of the power output attained at maximal oxygen uptake (PVO2max). The postmeasurement continued until 30 min after the end of the TT, during which GE was determined over 3-min intervals. The magnitude-based-inferences approach was used for statistical analysis. Results: GE decreased substantially during the 2000-m and 20,000-m TTs (-11.8% [3.6%] and -6.2% [4.0%], respectively). A most likely and very likely recovery of GE was found during the first half of the submaximal exercise bout performed after the 2000-m, with only a possible increase in GE during the first part of the submaximal exercise bout performed after the 20,000-m. After both distances, GE did not fully recover to the initial pre-TT values, as the difference between the pre-TT value and average GE value of minutes 26-29 was still most likely negative for both the 2000- and 20,000-m (-6.1% [2.8%] and -7.0% [4.5%], respectively). Conclusions: It is impossible to fully recover GE after TTs of 2000- or 20,000-m during 30 min of submaximal cycling exercise performed at an intensity of 55% PVO2max.

AB - Background: Research has shown that gross efficiency (GE) declines during high-intensity exercise, but the time course of recovery of GE after high-intensity exercise has not yet been investigated. Purpose: To determine the time course of the recovery of GE after time trials (TTs) of different lengths. Methods: Nineteen trained male cyclists participated in this study. Before and after TTs of 2000 and 20,000 m, subjects performed submaximal exercise at 55% of the power output attained at maximal oxygen uptake (PVO2max). The postmeasurement continued until 30 min after the end of the TT, during which GE was determined over 3-min intervals. The magnitude-based-inferences approach was used for statistical analysis. Results: GE decreased substantially during the 2000-m and 20,000-m TTs (-11.8% [3.6%] and -6.2% [4.0%], respectively). A most likely and very likely recovery of GE was found during the first half of the submaximal exercise bout performed after the 2000-m, with only a possible increase in GE during the first part of the submaximal exercise bout performed after the 20,000-m. After both distances, GE did not fully recover to the initial pre-TT values, as the difference between the pre-TT value and average GE value of minutes 26-29 was still most likely negative for both the 2000- and 20,000-m (-6.1% [2.8%] and -7.0% [4.5%], respectively). Conclusions: It is impossible to fully recover GE after TTs of 2000- or 20,000-m during 30 min of submaximal cycling exercise performed at an intensity of 55% PVO2max.

KW - Aerobic capacity

KW - Economy

KW - Fatigue

KW - Pacing strategy

KW - Performance

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