Researching how and what teachers learn from innovating their own educational practices: the ins and outs of a high-quality design

M. Stam, W.G. Miedema, J. Onstenk, W.L. Wardekker, G.T.M. ten Dam

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This article describes experiences with a qualitative research project into teachers' learning from innovating their own educational practices. Decades of New Public Management (NPM) in the Netherlands, with its top-down and businesslike approach to areas of public interest, obscured the learning and innovating capacity of teachers, teams, and schools. Merely studying the learning processes which take place at a teacher level would present insufficient insight into the deeper mechanisms which hinder or stimulate learning from innovation in a bottom-up manner. We, therefore, focused on the relations between different layers (individual, systemic) within schools. A high-quality design was required for answering the research question: How and what do teachers learn from innovating their own educational practices? This article elaborates upon this design and discusses the methodological findings and complications of this type of research. © 2013 Taylor & Francis.
Original languageEnglish
Article number2
Pages (from-to)251-267
Number of pages17
JournalInternational Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education
Volume2014
Issue number27
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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