Resources that make you generous: Effects of social and human resources on charitable giving

P. Wiepking, I. Maas

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

In this study we examine whether and why human and social resources increase charitable giving. Using the Giving in The Netherlands Panel Study 2003, we find that people with more extended networks and higher education are more generous. However, these effects can be completely explained by financial resources, church attendance, requests for donations, and prosocial personality characteristics. People with more extended social networks are mainly more generous because they receive more solicitations for donations, and are more integrated in extended religious networks that promote charitable giving. The generosity of people with higher formal education can be explained by their larger financial resources, and stronger verbal abilities. Whereas the effect of education seems mainly causal, that of network extension appears largely spurious. © The University of North Carolina Press.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1973-1996
Number of pages24
JournalSocial Forces
Volume86
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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human resources
donation
resources
church attendance
education
social network
personality
Netherlands
ability
Resources
Human Resources
Donation
The Netherlands
Generosity
Education
Church Attendance
Social Networks
Formal Education
Verbal Ability
Religion

Cite this

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Resources that make you generous: Effects of social and human resources on charitable giving. / Wiepking, P.; Maas, I.

In: Social Forces, Vol. 86, No. 4, 2009, p. 1973-1996.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

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AU - Wiepking, P.

AU - Maas, I.

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AB - In this study we examine whether and why human and social resources increase charitable giving. Using the Giving in The Netherlands Panel Study 2003, we find that people with more extended networks and higher education are more generous. However, these effects can be completely explained by financial resources, church attendance, requests for donations, and prosocial personality characteristics. People with more extended social networks are mainly more generous because they receive more solicitations for donations, and are more integrated in extended religious networks that promote charitable giving. The generosity of people with higher formal education can be explained by their larger financial resources, and stronger verbal abilities. Whereas the effect of education seems mainly causal, that of network extension appears largely spurious. © The University of North Carolina Press.

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DO - 10.1353/sof.0.0191

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SP - 1973

EP - 1996

JO - Social Forces

T2 - Social Forces

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