Ring-testing and field-validation of a terrestrial model ecosystem - An instrument for testing potentially harmful substances: effects of carbendazim on organic matter breakdown and soil fauna feeding activity.

B. Förster, C.A.M. van Gestel, J.E. Koolhaas, G. Nentwig, J.M.L. Rodrigues, J.P. Sousa, S.E. Jones, T. Knacker

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Organic matter (OM) decomposition and soil fauna feeding activity were integrated as functional endpoints into ecotoxicological tests with intact-soil-core Terrestrial Model Ecosystems (TMEs). Cellulose filter paper served as standardized OM and was either inserted into the top soil or placed on the soil surface for a period of up to 16 weeks. Faunal feeding activity was assessed by the bait-lamina method. The fungicide carbendazim, applied at six dosages ranging from 0.36 kg/ha to 87.5 kg a.i./ha, served as a model chemical. To validate the results from the TME test, a field study was run in parallel. In TMEs the cellulose paper inserted into the soil was decomposed faster than under field conditions. The carbendazim-induced effects on OM decomposition in TMEs and in the field were comparable and followed a clear dose-response relationship. The calculated EC
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)129-141
JournalEcotoxicology
Volume13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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