Rising methane emissions from northern wetlands associated with sea ice decline

F.J.W. Parmentier, W. Zhang, Y. Mi, X. Zhu, J. van Huissteden, D.J. Hayes, Q. Zhuang, T.R. Christensen, A. David McGuire

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The Arctic is rapidly transitioning toward a seasonal sea ice-free state, perhaps one of the most apparent examples of climate change in the world. This dramatic change has numerous consequences, including a large increase in air temperatures, which in turn may affect terrestrial methane emissions. Nonetheless, terrestrial and marine environments are seldom jointly analyzed. By comparing satellite observations of Arctic sea ice concentrations to methane emissions simulated by three process-based biogeochemical models, this study shows that rising wetland methane emissions are associated with sea ice retreat. Our analyses indicate that simulated high-latitude emissions for 2005-2010 were, on average, 1.7 Tg CH
Original languageEnglish
Article number17
Pages (from-to)7214-7222
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Issue number42
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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wetlands
sea ice
methane
wetland
ice retreat
marine environments
satellite observation
terrestrial environment
climate change
polar regions
marine environment
air temperature
methylidyne
air
temperature

Cite this

Parmentier, F. J. W., Zhang, W., Mi, Y., Zhu, X., van Huissteden, J., Hayes, D. J., ... David McGuire, A. (2015). Rising methane emissions from northern wetlands associated with sea ice decline. Geophysical Research Letters, (42), 7214-7222. [17]. https://doi.org/10.1002/2015GL065013
Parmentier, F.J.W. ; Zhang, W. ; Mi, Y. ; Zhu, X. ; van Huissteden, J. ; Hayes, D.J. ; Zhuang, Q. ; Christensen, T.R. ; David McGuire, A. / Rising methane emissions from northern wetlands associated with sea ice decline. In: Geophysical Research Letters. 2015 ; No. 42. pp. 7214-7222.
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Parmentier, FJW, Zhang, W, Mi, Y, Zhu, X, van Huissteden, J, Hayes, DJ, Zhuang, Q, Christensen, TR & David McGuire, A 2015, 'Rising methane emissions from northern wetlands associated with sea ice decline' Geophysical Research Letters, no. 42, 17, pp. 7214-7222. https://doi.org/10.1002/2015GL065013

Rising methane emissions from northern wetlands associated with sea ice decline. / Parmentier, F.J.W.; Zhang, W.; Mi, Y.; Zhu, X.; van Huissteden, J.; Hayes, D.J.; Zhuang, Q.; Christensen, T.R.; David McGuire, A.

In: Geophysical Research Letters, No. 42, 17, 2015, p. 7214-7222.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Parmentier, F.J.W.

AU - Zhang, W.

AU - Mi, Y.

AU - Zhu, X.

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AU - Hayes, D.J.

AU - Zhuang, Q.

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AU - David McGuire, A.

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AB - The Arctic is rapidly transitioning toward a seasonal sea ice-free state, perhaps one of the most apparent examples of climate change in the world. This dramatic change has numerous consequences, including a large increase in air temperatures, which in turn may affect terrestrial methane emissions. Nonetheless, terrestrial and marine environments are seldom jointly analyzed. By comparing satellite observations of Arctic sea ice concentrations to methane emissions simulated by three process-based biogeochemical models, this study shows that rising wetland methane emissions are associated with sea ice retreat. Our analyses indicate that simulated high-latitude emissions for 2005-2010 were, on average, 1.7 Tg CH

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