Risk factors as moderators of recovery during and after interventions for children exposed to interparental violence

M.M. Overbeek, J.C. de Schipper, F. Lamers-Winkelman, C. Schuengel

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

High family risk was tested as an impediment to recovery in children exposed to interparental violence (IPV) participating in community-based intervention. Characteristics of IPV were also explored as moderators for the effect of an IPV-focused intervention over a common factors intervention. Baseline, posttest and follow-up measurements of 155 parents and children (aged 6 to 12 years; 55.5% boys) were fitted in a multilevel model. Outcomes were clinical classifications of internalizing and externalizing problems, and posttraumatic stress symptoms. Tested moderators were child maltreatment, symptoms of disordered attachment, parental psychopathology, parenting stress, poverty, and IPV characteristics. Children without symptoms of disinhibited social engagement disorder, children of parents with high levels of psychopathology, and children of parents with high levels of parenting stress showed strongest recovery. Participation in an IPV-focused intervention was not more effective than in a common factors intervention, irrespective of the nature of the IPV. Based on rate of recovery, participation in community-based group interventions does not need to be contraindicated for children facing high family risk after being exposed to IPV, except for children with symptoms of disinhibited social engagement disorder. © 2014 American Orthopsychiatric Association.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)295-306
JournalAmerican Journal of Orthopsychiatry
Volume84
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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