Risk models for lower extremity injuries among short- and long distance runners: A prospective cohort study

Dennis van Poppel, Gwendolijne G.M. Scholten-Peeters, Marienke van Middelkoop, Bart W. Koes, Arianne P. Verhagen

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Running injuries are very common. Risk factors for running injuries are not consistently described across studies and do not differentiate between runners of long- and short distances within one cohort. Objectives: The aim of this study is to determine risk factors for running injuries in recreational long- and short distance runners separately. Design: A prospective cohort study. Methods: Recreational runners from four different running events are invited to participate. They filled in a baseline questionnaire assessing possible risk factors about 4 weeks before the run and one a week after the run assessing running injuries. Using logistic regression we developed an overall risk model and separate risk models based on the running distance. Results: In total 3768 runners participated in this study. The overall risk model contained 4 risk factors: previous injuries (OR 3.7) and running distance during the event (OR 1.3) increased the risk of a running injury whereas older age (OR 0.99) and more training kilometers per week (OR 0.99) showed a decrease. Models between short- and long distance runners did not differ significantly. Previous injuries increased the risk of a running injury in all models, while more training kilometers per week decreased this risk. Conclusions: We found that risk factors for running injuries were not related to running distances. Previous injury is a generic risk factor for running injuries, as is weekly training distance. Prevention of running injuries is important and a higher weekly training volume seems to prevent injuries to a certain extent.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)48-53
Number of pages6
JournalMusculoskeletal Science and Practice
Volume36
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2018

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Lower Extremity
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Wounds and Injuries
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Risk factors
  • Risk model
  • Running
  • Running-related injuries

Cite this

van Poppel, Dennis ; Scholten-Peeters, Gwendolijne G.M. ; van Middelkoop, Marienke ; Koes, Bart W. ; Verhagen, Arianne P. / Risk models for lower extremity injuries among short- and long distance runners : A prospective cohort study. In: Musculoskeletal Science and Practice. 2018 ; Vol. 36. pp. 48-53.
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Risk models for lower extremity injuries among short- and long distance runners : A prospective cohort study. / van Poppel, Dennis; Scholten-Peeters, Gwendolijne G.M.; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Koes, Bart W.; Verhagen, Arianne P.

In: Musculoskeletal Science and Practice, Vol. 36, 01.08.2018, p. 48-53.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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