School-aged children after the end of successful treatment of non-central nervous system cancer: Longitudinal assessment of health-related quality of life, anxiety and coping

H. Maurice-Stam, F.J. Oort, B.F. Last, P.P. Brons, H.N. Caron, M.A. Grootenhuis

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Abstract

The aim of the study was to investigate: (1) health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and anxiety in school-aged cancer survivors during the first 4 years of continuous remission after the end of treatment; and (2) correlations of disease-related coping with HRQoL and anxiety. A total of 76 survivors aged 8-15 years completed questionnaires about HRQoL, anxiety and disease-related cognitive coping at one to five measurement occasions. Their HRQoL was compared with norm data, 2 months (n = 49) and 1 year (n = 41), 2 years (n = 41), 3 years (n = 42) and 4 years (n = 27) after treatment. Through longitudinal mixed models analyses it was investigated to what extent disease-related cognitive coping was associated with HRQoL and anxiety over time, independent of the impact of demographic and medical variables. Survivors reported worse Motor Functioning (HRQoL) 2 months after the end of treatment, but from 1 year after treatment they did no longer differ from the norm population. Lower levels of anxiety were associated with male gender, being more optimistic about the further course of the disease (predictive control) and less searching for information about the disease (interpretative control). Stronger reliance on the physician (vicarious control) was associated with better mental HRQoL. As a group, survivors regained good HRQoL from 1 year after treatment. Monitoring and screening survivors are necessary to be able to trace the survivors at risk of worse HRQoL. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)401-410
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Journal of Cancer Care
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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