Searching for strategies to reduce the mechanical demands of the sit-to-stand task with a muscle-actuated optimal control model

M.F. Bobbert, D.A. Kistemaker, M.A. Vaz, M Ackermann

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background The sit-to-stand task, which involves rising unassisted from sitting on a chair to standing, is important in daily life. Many people with muscle weakness, reduced range of motion or loading-related pain in a particular joint have difficulty performing the task. How should a person suffering from such impairment best perform the sit-to-stand task and, in the case of pain in a particular joint, with reduced loading of that joint? Methods We developed a musculoskeletal model with reference parameter values based on properties of healthy strong subjects. The model's muscle stimulation-time input was optimized using direct collocation to find strategies that yielded successful sit-to-stand task performance with minimum ‘control effort’ for the reference set and modified sets of parameter values, and with constraints on tibiofemoral compression force. Findings The sit-to-stand task could be performed successfully and realistically by the reference model, by a model with isometric knee extensor forces reduced to 40% of reference, by a model with isometric forces of all muscles reduced to 45% of reference, and by the reference model with the tibiofemoral compression force constrained during optimization to 65% of the peak value in the reference condition. Interpretation The strategies found by the model in conditions other than reference could be interpreted well on the basis of cost function and task biomechanics. The question remains whether it is feasible to teach patients with musculoskeletal impairments or joint pain to perform the sit-to-stand task according to strategies that are optimal according to the simulation model.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83-90
JournalClinical Biomechanics
Volume37
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Joints
Muscles
Reference Values
Pain
Musculoskeletal Pain
Muscle Weakness
Arthralgia
Task Performance and Analysis
Articular Range of Motion
Biomechanical Phenomena
Knee
Healthy Volunteers
Costs and Cost Analysis

Cite this

@article{4a1d7f6f69f344ed93c106fa95c5d49e,
title = "Searching for strategies to reduce the mechanical demands of the sit-to-stand task with a muscle-actuated optimal control model",
abstract = "Background The sit-to-stand task, which involves rising unassisted from sitting on a chair to standing, is important in daily life. Many people with muscle weakness, reduced range of motion or loading-related pain in a particular joint have difficulty performing the task. How should a person suffering from such impairment best perform the sit-to-stand task and, in the case of pain in a particular joint, with reduced loading of that joint? Methods We developed a musculoskeletal model with reference parameter values based on properties of healthy strong subjects. The model's muscle stimulation-time input was optimized using direct collocation to find strategies that yielded successful sit-to-stand task performance with minimum ‘control effort’ for the reference set and modified sets of parameter values, and with constraints on tibiofemoral compression force. Findings The sit-to-stand task could be performed successfully and realistically by the reference model, by a model with isometric knee extensor forces reduced to 40{\%} of reference, by a model with isometric forces of all muscles reduced to 45{\%} of reference, and by the reference model with the tibiofemoral compression force constrained during optimization to 65{\%} of the peak value in the reference condition. Interpretation The strategies found by the model in conditions other than reference could be interpreted well on the basis of cost function and task biomechanics. The question remains whether it is feasible to teach patients with musculoskeletal impairments or joint pain to perform the sit-to-stand task according to strategies that are optimal according to the simulation model.",
author = "M.F. Bobbert and D.A. Kistemaker and M.A. Vaz and M Ackermann",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2016.06.008",
language = "English",
volume = "37",
pages = "83--90",
journal = "Clinical Biomechanics",
issn = "0268-0033",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

Searching for strategies to reduce the mechanical demands of the sit-to-stand task with a muscle-actuated optimal control model. / Bobbert, M.F.; Kistemaker, D.A.; Vaz, M.A.; Ackermann, M.

In: Clinical Biomechanics, Vol. 37, 2016, p. 83-90.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Searching for strategies to reduce the mechanical demands of the sit-to-stand task with a muscle-actuated optimal control model

AU - Bobbert, M.F.

AU - Kistemaker, D.A.

AU - Vaz, M.A.

AU - Ackermann, M

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Background The sit-to-stand task, which involves rising unassisted from sitting on a chair to standing, is important in daily life. Many people with muscle weakness, reduced range of motion or loading-related pain in a particular joint have difficulty performing the task. How should a person suffering from such impairment best perform the sit-to-stand task and, in the case of pain in a particular joint, with reduced loading of that joint? Methods We developed a musculoskeletal model with reference parameter values based on properties of healthy strong subjects. The model's muscle stimulation-time input was optimized using direct collocation to find strategies that yielded successful sit-to-stand task performance with minimum ‘control effort’ for the reference set and modified sets of parameter values, and with constraints on tibiofemoral compression force. Findings The sit-to-stand task could be performed successfully and realistically by the reference model, by a model with isometric knee extensor forces reduced to 40% of reference, by a model with isometric forces of all muscles reduced to 45% of reference, and by the reference model with the tibiofemoral compression force constrained during optimization to 65% of the peak value in the reference condition. Interpretation The strategies found by the model in conditions other than reference could be interpreted well on the basis of cost function and task biomechanics. The question remains whether it is feasible to teach patients with musculoskeletal impairments or joint pain to perform the sit-to-stand task according to strategies that are optimal according to the simulation model.

AB - Background The sit-to-stand task, which involves rising unassisted from sitting on a chair to standing, is important in daily life. Many people with muscle weakness, reduced range of motion or loading-related pain in a particular joint have difficulty performing the task. How should a person suffering from such impairment best perform the sit-to-stand task and, in the case of pain in a particular joint, with reduced loading of that joint? Methods We developed a musculoskeletal model with reference parameter values based on properties of healthy strong subjects. The model's muscle stimulation-time input was optimized using direct collocation to find strategies that yielded successful sit-to-stand task performance with minimum ‘control effort’ for the reference set and modified sets of parameter values, and with constraints on tibiofemoral compression force. Findings The sit-to-stand task could be performed successfully and realistically by the reference model, by a model with isometric knee extensor forces reduced to 40% of reference, by a model with isometric forces of all muscles reduced to 45% of reference, and by the reference model with the tibiofemoral compression force constrained during optimization to 65% of the peak value in the reference condition. Interpretation The strategies found by the model in conditions other than reference could be interpreted well on the basis of cost function and task biomechanics. The question remains whether it is feasible to teach patients with musculoskeletal impairments or joint pain to perform the sit-to-stand task according to strategies that are optimal according to the simulation model.

U2 - 10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2016.06.008

DO - 10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2016.06.008

M3 - Article

VL - 37

SP - 83

EP - 90

JO - Clinical Biomechanics

JF - Clinical Biomechanics

SN - 0268-0033

ER -