Self-esteem and outcome fairness judgments: Differential use of procedural and outcome information

R Vermunt, D. van Knippenberg, B.M. van Knippenberg, E. Blaauw

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Abstract

Results of a survey of 222 detainees in Dutch jails and police stations showed that outcome-fairness judgments of individuals with high self-esteem were more strongly related to outcome considerations than to procedural considerations, whereas outcome-fairness judgments of individuals with low self-esteem were more strongly related to procedural considerations than to outcome considerations. It was proposed that these differences were due to the fact that (a) procedures more strongly express a social evaluation than outcomes and (b) individuals with low self-esteem are more concerned with social evaluations than individuals with high self-esteem. The implications of the results for other individual-differences factors and other populations than detainees are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)621-628
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume86
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

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