Short-term changes of metal availability in soil. Part I: Comparing sludge-amended with metal-spiked soils.

T. Natal-da-Luz, G. Ojeda, D.M. Costa, J. Pratas, R.P. Lanno, C.A.M. van Gestel, J.P. Sousa

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Sewage sludge application to soils is regulated by its total metal content. However, the real risk of metals is determined by the fraction that is biologically available. The available fraction is highly related to the strength of metal binding by the matrix, which is a dynamic process. The evaluation of the fate of metals in time can contribute increased accuracy of ecological risk assessment. Aiming to evaluate short-Term changes in metal availability when metals were applied to soil directly (metal-spiked) or by way of an organic matrix (sludge-Amended), a laboratory experiment was performed using open microcosms filled with agricultural soil. A concentration gradient of industrial sludge (11, 15, 55, and 75 t/ha) that was contaminated predominantly with chromium, copper, nickel, and zinc, or soil freshly spiked with the same concentrations of these metals, were applied on top of the agricultural soil. After 0, 3, 6, and 12 weeks, total (HNO
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)199-208
JournalArchives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology
Volume63
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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