Signs of the Shoah: The Hollandsche Schouwburg as a site of memory

D.A. Duindam

Research output: PhD ThesisPhD Thesis - Research external, graduation externalAcademic

Abstract

This dissertation investigates the postwar development of the Hollandsche Schouwburg, an in situ Shoah memorial museum in Amsterdam, within the fields of memory, heritage and museum studies. During World War II, over forty-six thousand Jews were imprisoned in this former theater before being deported to the transit camps. In 1962, it became the first national Shoah memorial of the Netherlands and in 1993, a small exhibition was added. In the spring of 2016, the National Holocaust Museum opened, which consists of the Hollandsche Schouwburg and a new satellite space across the street.
This dissertation deals with the question how this site of painful heritage became an important memorial museum dedicated to the memory of the persecution of the Dutch Jews. I argue that this former theater was not a site of oblivion before 1962 but rather a material reminder of the persecution of the Jews which at that time was not an articulated part of the hegemonic memory discourse of the war in the Netherlands. The memorial was gradually appropriated by important Jewish institutions through the installment of Yom HaShoah, an educational exhibition and a wall of names. These are analyzed not by focusing on material authenticity, but instead a case is made for latent indexicality: visitors actively produce narratives by searching for traces of the past. This entails an ongoing creative process of meaning-making that allows sites of memory to expand and proliferate beyond their borders. An important question therefore is how the Hollandsche Schouwburg affects its direct surroundings.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationPhD
Awarding Institution
  • UvA
Supervisors/Advisors
  • van Vree, F.P.I.M., Supervisor, External person
  • van der Laarse, Rob, Supervisor
Award date28 Jun 2016
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Shoah
Sites of Memory
Memorial
Jews
Persecution
The Netherlands
Heritage
Creative Process
Museum Studies
Oblivion
Holocaust
Installment
Names
Second World War
Meaning Making
Authenticity
In Situ
Discourse
Amsterdam
Indexicality

Bibliographical note

NWO research line Dynamiek van de herinnering (UvA, VUA, NIOD)
For copyright reasons, some illustrations have been blacked out in the thesis downloads.http://dare.uva.nl/record/1/534981
Naam instelling promotie: UvA
Naam instelling onderzoek: GW-UvA

Cite this

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title = "Signs of the Shoah: The Hollandsche Schouwburg as a site of memory",
abstract = "This dissertation investigates the postwar development of the Hollandsche Schouwburg, an in situ Shoah memorial museum in Amsterdam, within the fields of memory, heritage and museum studies. During World War II, over forty-six thousand Jews were imprisoned in this former theater before being deported to the transit camps. In 1962, it became the first national Shoah memorial of the Netherlands and in 1993, a small exhibition was added. In the spring of 2016, the National Holocaust Museum opened, which consists of the Hollandsche Schouwburg and a new satellite space across the street. This dissertation deals with the question how this site of painful heritage became an important memorial museum dedicated to the memory of the persecution of the Dutch Jews. I argue that this former theater was not a site of oblivion before 1962 but rather a material reminder of the persecution of the Jews which at that time was not an articulated part of the hegemonic memory discourse of the war in the Netherlands. The memorial was gradually appropriated by important Jewish institutions through the installment of Yom HaShoah, an educational exhibition and a wall of names. These are analyzed not by focusing on material authenticity, but instead a case is made for latent indexicality: visitors actively produce narratives by searching for traces of the past. This entails an ongoing creative process of meaning-making that allows sites of memory to expand and proliferate beyond their borders. An important question therefore is how the Hollandsche Schouwburg affects its direct surroundings.",
author = "D.A. Duindam",
note = "NWO research line Dynamiek van de herinnering (UvA, VUA, NIOD) For copyright reasons, some illustrations have been blacked out in the thesis downloads.http://dare.uva.nl/record/1/534981 Naam instelling promotie: UvA Naam instelling onderzoek: GW-UvA",
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Signs of the Shoah: The Hollandsche Schouwburg as a site of memory. / Duindam, D.A.

2016. 242 p.

Research output: PhD ThesisPhD Thesis - Research external, graduation externalAcademic

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T1 - Signs of the Shoah: The Hollandsche Schouwburg as a site of memory

AU - Duindam, D.A.

N1 - NWO research line Dynamiek van de herinnering (UvA, VUA, NIOD) For copyright reasons, some illustrations have been blacked out in the thesis downloads.http://dare.uva.nl/record/1/534981 Naam instelling promotie: UvA Naam instelling onderzoek: GW-UvA

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - This dissertation investigates the postwar development of the Hollandsche Schouwburg, an in situ Shoah memorial museum in Amsterdam, within the fields of memory, heritage and museum studies. During World War II, over forty-six thousand Jews were imprisoned in this former theater before being deported to the transit camps. In 1962, it became the first national Shoah memorial of the Netherlands and in 1993, a small exhibition was added. In the spring of 2016, the National Holocaust Museum opened, which consists of the Hollandsche Schouwburg and a new satellite space across the street. This dissertation deals with the question how this site of painful heritage became an important memorial museum dedicated to the memory of the persecution of the Dutch Jews. I argue that this former theater was not a site of oblivion before 1962 but rather a material reminder of the persecution of the Jews which at that time was not an articulated part of the hegemonic memory discourse of the war in the Netherlands. The memorial was gradually appropriated by important Jewish institutions through the installment of Yom HaShoah, an educational exhibition and a wall of names. These are analyzed not by focusing on material authenticity, but instead a case is made for latent indexicality: visitors actively produce narratives by searching for traces of the past. This entails an ongoing creative process of meaning-making that allows sites of memory to expand and proliferate beyond their borders. An important question therefore is how the Hollandsche Schouwburg affects its direct surroundings.

AB - This dissertation investigates the postwar development of the Hollandsche Schouwburg, an in situ Shoah memorial museum in Amsterdam, within the fields of memory, heritage and museum studies. During World War II, over forty-six thousand Jews were imprisoned in this former theater before being deported to the transit camps. In 1962, it became the first national Shoah memorial of the Netherlands and in 1993, a small exhibition was added. In the spring of 2016, the National Holocaust Museum opened, which consists of the Hollandsche Schouwburg and a new satellite space across the street. This dissertation deals with the question how this site of painful heritage became an important memorial museum dedicated to the memory of the persecution of the Dutch Jews. I argue that this former theater was not a site of oblivion before 1962 but rather a material reminder of the persecution of the Jews which at that time was not an articulated part of the hegemonic memory discourse of the war in the Netherlands. The memorial was gradually appropriated by important Jewish institutions through the installment of Yom HaShoah, an educational exhibition and a wall of names. These are analyzed not by focusing on material authenticity, but instead a case is made for latent indexicality: visitors actively produce narratives by searching for traces of the past. This entails an ongoing creative process of meaning-making that allows sites of memory to expand and proliferate beyond their borders. An important question therefore is how the Hollandsche Schouwburg affects its direct surroundings.

M3 - PhD Thesis - Research external, graduation external

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