Situated Embodied Cogniton: Monitoring Orientation Cues Affects Product Evaluation and Choice

J. Eelen, S. Dewitte, L. Warlop

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Consumers generally prefer products that are easy to interact with. In three studies, we show that this preference arises from the fit between product orientation and monitored situational constraints. Flexible right-handers, who monitor situational constraints, recall product orientations better and prefer products for which the handle is oriented in the direction of the hand used for grasping. When their ability to monitor situational constraints is impaired, the preference for easy-to-grasp products is attenuated. The findings highlight that motor fluency is a relevant cue for decision making when consumers assess how to interact with a product. The implications of these results for embodiment and fluency research are discussed. © 2013 Society for Consumer Psychology.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)424-433
JournalJournal of Consumer Psychology
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Product Recalls and Withdrawals
Aptitude
Hand Strength
Cues
Decision Making
Hand
Psychology
Research
Direction compound
Monitoring
Product choice
Product evaluation

Cite this

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abstract = "Consumers generally prefer products that are easy to interact with. In three studies, we show that this preference arises from the fit between product orientation and monitored situational constraints. Flexible right-handers, who monitor situational constraints, recall product orientations better and prefer products for which the handle is oriented in the direction of the hand used for grasping. When their ability to monitor situational constraints is impaired, the preference for easy-to-grasp products is attenuated. The findings highlight that motor fluency is a relevant cue for decision making when consumers assess how to interact with a product. The implications of these results for embodiment and fluency research are discussed. {\circledC} 2013 Society for Consumer Psychology.",
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Situated Embodied Cogniton: Monitoring Orientation Cues Affects Product Evaluation and Choice. / Eelen, J.; Dewitte, S.; Warlop, L.

In: Journal of Consumer Psychology, Vol. 23, No. 4, 2013, p. 424-433.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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