Social exclusion and the evolution of cooperation

Research output: Contribution to ConferenceAbstractOther research output

Abstract

Social exclusion, and the threat of, represents a strong mechanism for both self-regulation and social regulation. Recent theorizing has proposed a link between social exclusion and the evolution of cooperation, posing that cognitive and emotional adaptations aimed at excluding particular individuals from the group, may function as a mechanism to regulate group and individual’s cooperation. Here we formalize this statement with the aid of computer simulations of evolutionary scenarios featuring groups in social dilemma situations. We show that social exclusion may represent a powerful mechanism to maintain group cooperation in the long term, whereby facilitating the evolution of cooperative and altruistic traits. We also compare the effect of social exclusion on the emergence of cooperation with other well-known mechanisms, such as reciprocity, reputation, and punishment. We show that social exclusion is more powerful and more adaptive than any of these mechanisms.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 20 Jul 2005
Event14th General Meeting of the European Association for Experimental Social Psychology - Würzberg, Germany
Duration: 19 Jul 200523 Jul 2005

Conference

Conference14th General Meeting of the European Association for Experimental Social Psychology
CountryGermany
CityWürzberg
Period19/07/0523/07/05

Fingerprint

Punishment
Computer Simulation
Emotional Adjustment
Self-Control

Cite this

Gallucci, M., Ouwerkerk, J. W., & van Lange, P. A. M. (2005). Social exclusion and the evolution of cooperation. Abstract from 14th General Meeting of the European Association for Experimental Social Psychology, Würzberg, Germany.
Gallucci, M. ; Ouwerkerk, J.W. ; van Lange, P.A.M. / Social exclusion and the evolution of cooperation. Abstract from 14th General Meeting of the European Association for Experimental Social Psychology, Würzberg, Germany.
@conference{45a28058ef464b1886b2707800198f5b,
title = "Social exclusion and the evolution of cooperation",
abstract = "Social exclusion, and the threat of, represents a strong mechanism for both self-regulation and social regulation. Recent theorizing has proposed a link between social exclusion and the evolution of cooperation, posing that cognitive and emotional adaptations aimed at excluding particular individuals from the group, may function as a mechanism to regulate group and individual’s cooperation. Here we formalize this statement with the aid of computer simulations of evolutionary scenarios featuring groups in social dilemma situations. We show that social exclusion may represent a powerful mechanism to maintain group cooperation in the long term, whereby facilitating the evolution of cooperative and altruistic traits. We also compare the effect of social exclusion on the emergence of cooperation with other well-known mechanisms, such as reciprocity, reputation, and punishment. We show that social exclusion is more powerful and more adaptive than any of these mechanisms.",
author = "M. Gallucci and J.W. Ouwerkerk and {van Lange}, P.A.M.",
year = "2005",
month = "7",
day = "20",
language = "English",
note = "14th General Meeting of the European Association for Experimental Social Psychology ; Conference date: 19-07-2005 Through 23-07-2005",

}

Gallucci, M, Ouwerkerk, JW & van Lange, PAM 2005, 'Social exclusion and the evolution of cooperation' 14th General Meeting of the European Association for Experimental Social Psychology, Würzberg, Germany, 19/07/05 - 23/07/05, .

Social exclusion and the evolution of cooperation. / Gallucci, M.; Ouwerkerk, J.W.; van Lange, P.A.M.

2005. Abstract from 14th General Meeting of the European Association for Experimental Social Psychology, Würzberg, Germany.

Research output: Contribution to ConferenceAbstractOther research output

TY - CONF

T1 - Social exclusion and the evolution of cooperation

AU - Gallucci, M.

AU - Ouwerkerk, J.W.

AU - van Lange, P.A.M.

PY - 2005/7/20

Y1 - 2005/7/20

N2 - Social exclusion, and the threat of, represents a strong mechanism for both self-regulation and social regulation. Recent theorizing has proposed a link between social exclusion and the evolution of cooperation, posing that cognitive and emotional adaptations aimed at excluding particular individuals from the group, may function as a mechanism to regulate group and individual’s cooperation. Here we formalize this statement with the aid of computer simulations of evolutionary scenarios featuring groups in social dilemma situations. We show that social exclusion may represent a powerful mechanism to maintain group cooperation in the long term, whereby facilitating the evolution of cooperative and altruistic traits. We also compare the effect of social exclusion on the emergence of cooperation with other well-known mechanisms, such as reciprocity, reputation, and punishment. We show that social exclusion is more powerful and more adaptive than any of these mechanisms.

AB - Social exclusion, and the threat of, represents a strong mechanism for both self-regulation and social regulation. Recent theorizing has proposed a link between social exclusion and the evolution of cooperation, posing that cognitive and emotional adaptations aimed at excluding particular individuals from the group, may function as a mechanism to regulate group and individual’s cooperation. Here we formalize this statement with the aid of computer simulations of evolutionary scenarios featuring groups in social dilemma situations. We show that social exclusion may represent a powerful mechanism to maintain group cooperation in the long term, whereby facilitating the evolution of cooperative and altruistic traits. We also compare the effect of social exclusion on the emergence of cooperation with other well-known mechanisms, such as reciprocity, reputation, and punishment. We show that social exclusion is more powerful and more adaptive than any of these mechanisms.

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Gallucci M, Ouwerkerk JW, van Lange PAM. Social exclusion and the evolution of cooperation. 2005. Abstract from 14th General Meeting of the European Association for Experimental Social Psychology, Würzberg, Germany.