Social Value Orientations and Impressions of Partner's Honesty and Intelligence: A Test of the Might Versus Morality Effect

Paul A.M. Van Lange*, D. Michael Kuhlman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This research evaluates the might vs. morality effect (Liebrand, Jansen, Rijken, & Suhre, 1986) by examining whether the manipulation of the perception of partner's honesty and intelligence interacts with the observer's own social value orientation to influence the latter's expectations regarding partner cooperation and own cooperation in a social dilemma. Results reveal that greater cooperation was expected from an honest partner than from a dishonest partner and that this effect was stronger for prosocial Ss than for individualists and competitors. Conversely, individualists and competitors expected greater cooperation from an unintelligent partner than from an intelligent partner, whereas prosocial Ss did not expect differences between these partners. Similar findings were obtained for own cooperation, although social value orientations did not interact with partner intelligence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)126-141
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume67
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1994

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