Stereotypes about surgeon warmth and competence: The role of surgeon gender

Claire E. Ashton-James, Joshua M. Tybur, Verena Grießer, Daniel Costa

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Past research indicates that patient perceptions of surgeon warmth and competence influence treatment expectancies and satisfaction with treatment outcomes. Stereotypes have a powerful impact on impression formation. The present research explores stereotypes about surgeon warmth and competence and investigates the extent to which surgeon gender influences perceptions of female and male surgeons. A between-subjects experiment was conducted online using crowdsourcing technology to derive a representative sample from the general population. Four hundred and fifteen participants were randomly assigned to evaluate the warmth and competence of males, females, surgeons, male surgeons, or female surgeons, using validated measures. Planned contrasts revealed that as a group, surgeons received higher warmth and competence ratings than non-surgeons (p = .007). Consistent with gender stereotypes, female surgeons received higher warmth ratings (p < .001) and lower competence ratings (p = .001) than male surgeons. The stereotype of surgeons held by the general public is that they are high in warmth and competence relative to other occupational groups. Surgeon gender appears to influence general beliefs about the warmth and competence of female and male surgeons.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0211890
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Feb 2019

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stereotyped behavior
surgeons
Mental Competency
gender
Experiments
Surgeons
Crowdsourcing
Occupational Groups
Research

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Ashton-James, Claire E. ; Tybur, Joshua M. ; Grießer, Verena ; Costa, Daniel. / Stereotypes about surgeon warmth and competence : The role of surgeon gender. In: PLoS ONE. 2019 ; Vol. 14, No. 2. pp. 1-10.
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Stereotypes about surgeon warmth and competence : The role of surgeon gender. / Ashton-James, Claire E.; Tybur, Joshua M.; Grießer, Verena; Costa, Daniel.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 14, No. 2, e0211890, 27.02.2019, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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