Stereotypes help people connect with others in the community: A situated functional analysis of the stereotype consistency bias in communication

A.E. Clark, Y. Kashima

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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    Abstract

    Communicators tend to share more stereotype-consistent than stereotype-inconsistent information. The authors propose and test a situated functional model of this stereotype consistency bias: Stereotype-consistent and inconsistent information differentially serve 2 central functions of communication-sharing information and regulating relationships; depending on the communication context, information seen to serve these different functions better is more likely communicated. Results showed that stereotype-consistent information is perceived as more socially connective but less informative than inconsistent information, and when the stereotype is perceived to be highly shared in the community, more stereotype-consistent than inconsistent information is communicated due to its greater social connectivity function. These results highlight the need to examine communication as a dynamic and situated social activity. © 2007 American Psychological Association.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1028-1039
    JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
    Volume93
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2007

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